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"Sandhusn zieht aus" hat nichts mit dem Entledigen eines männlichen Kleidungsstückes zu tun. Er hat vielmehr einen historischen Bezug. Mit dem Niedergang des Bergbaues im Erzgebirge mussten andere Erwerbsmöglichkeiten gesucht werden. Neben dem Klöppeln und der Posamentenindustrie war dies in Geyer der Verkauf von Scheuersand, der als Nebenprodukt den Kiesgruben der Umgebung anfiel. Die Kinder die "auszogen" um eben diesen Sand zu verkaufen, wurden dann "Sandhusn" genannt. Dieser Spitzname wird übrigens bis heute für jeden Bewohner in Geyer verwendet.


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Where to buy diflucan pills

Patients Figure 1 where to buy diflucan pills. Figure 1. Enrollment and where to buy diflucan pills Randomization. Of the 1107 patients who were assessed for eligibility, 1063 underwent randomization.

541 were assigned to the remdesivir group and where to buy diflucan pills 522 to the placebo group (Figure 1). Of those assigned to receive remdesivir, 531 patients (98.2%) received the treatment as assigned. Forty-nine patients had remdesivir treatment discontinued before day 10 because of an adverse event or a serious adverse event other than death (36 patients) or because the patient where to buy diflucan pills withdrew consent (13). Of those assigned to receive placebo, 518 patients (99.2%) received placebo as assigned.

Fifty-three patients discontinued placebo before day 10 because of an adverse event or a serious adverse event other than death (36 patients), because the patient withdrew consent (15), or because the patient was found to be ineligible for trial enrollment (2). As of April 28, 2020, a total of 391 patients in the remdesivir group and 340 in the placebo group had completed the trial through day 29, recovered, or died where to buy diflucan pills. Eight patients who received remdesivir and 9 who received placebo terminated their participation in the trial before day 29. There were where to buy diflucan pills 132 patients in the remdesivir group and 169 in the placebo group who had not recovered and had not completed the day 29 follow-up visit.

The analysis population included 1059 patients for whom we have at least some postbaseline data available (538 in the remdesivir group and 521 in the placebo group). Four of where to buy diflucan pills the 1063 patients were not included in the primary analysis because no postbaseline data were available at the time of the database freeze. Table 1. Table 1 where to buy diflucan pills.

Demographic and Clinical Characteristics at Baseline. The mean age of patients was 58.9 years, and 64.3% were male (Table 1). On the basis of the evolving epidemiology of Covid-19 during the trial, 79.8% of patients were enrolled at sites in North America, 15.3% in Europe, and 4.9% in Asia (Table S1) where to buy diflucan pills. Overall, 53.2% of the patients were white, 20.6% were black, 12.6% were Asian, and 13.6% were designated as other or not reported.

249 (23.4%) where to buy diflucan pills were Hispanic or Latino. Most patients had either one (27.0%) or two or more (52.1%) of the prespecified coexisting conditions at enrollment, most commonly hypertension (49.6%), obesity (37.0%), and type 2 diabetes mellitus (29.7%). The median number of days where to buy diflucan pills between symptom onset and randomization was 9 (interquartile range, 6 to 12). Nine hundred forty-three (88.7%) patients had severe disease at enrollment as defined in the Supplementary Appendix.

272 (25.6%) patients met category 7 criteria on the ordinal scale, 197 (18.5%) category 6, 421 (39.6%) category 5, where to buy diflucan pills and 127 (11.9%) category 4. There were 46 (4.3%) patients who had missing ordinal scale data at enrollment. No substantial imbalances in baseline characteristics were observed between the remdesivir group and the placebo group. Primary Outcome where to buy diflucan pills Figure 2.

Figure 2. Kaplan–Meier Estimates of Cumulative Recoveries where to buy diflucan pills. Cumulative recovery estimates are shown in the overall population (Panel A), in patients with a baseline score of 4 on the ordinal scale (not receiving oxygen. Panel B), in those with a baseline score where to buy diflucan pills of 5 (receiving oxygen.

Panel C), in those with a baseline score of 6 (receiving high-flow oxygen or noninvasive mechanical ventilation. Panel D), and in those with a baseline score of 7 (receiving mechanical ventilation or ECMO where to buy diflucan pills. Panel E). Table 2.

Table 2 where to buy diflucan pills. Outcomes Overall and According to Score on the Ordinal Scale in the Intention-to-Treat Population. Figure 3 where to buy diflucan pills. Figure 3.

Time to Recovery where to buy diflucan pills According to Subgroup. The widths of the confidence intervals have not been adjusted for multiplicity and therefore cannot be used to infer treatment effects. Race and ethnic group where to buy diflucan pills were reported by the patients. Patients in the remdesivir group had a shorter time to recovery than patients in the placebo group (median, 11 days, as compared with 15 days.

Rate ratio for recovery, 1.32. 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.12 where to buy diflucan pills to 1.55. P<0.001. 1059 patients (Figure 2 and Table where to buy diflucan pills 2).

Among patients with a baseline ordinal score of 5 (421 patients), the rate ratio for recovery was 1.47 (95% CI, 1.17 to 1.84). Among patients with a baseline score of 4 (127 patients) and those with a baseline score of where to buy diflucan pills 6 (197 patients), the rate ratio estimates for recovery were 1.38 (95% CI, 0.94 to 2.03) and 1.20 (95% CI, 0.79 to 1.81), respectively. For those receiving mechanical ventilation or ECMO at enrollment (baseline ordinal scores of 7. 272 patients), the rate ratio for recovery was where to buy diflucan pills 0.95 (95% CI, 0.64 to 1.42).

A test of interaction of treatment with baseline score on the ordinal scale was not significant. An analysis adjusting for baseline ordinal score as a stratification variable was conducted to evaluate the overall effect (of the percentage of patients in each ordinal score category at baseline) on the primary outcome. This adjusted where to buy diflucan pills analysis produced a similar treatment-effect estimate (rate ratio for recovery, 1.31. 95% CI, 1.12 to 1.54.

1017 patients) where to buy diflucan pills. Table S2 in the Supplementary Appendix shows results according to the baseline severity stratum of mild-to-moderate as compared with severe. Patients who underwent randomization during the first 10 days after the where to buy diflucan pills onset of symptoms had a rate ratio for recovery of 1.28 (95% CI, 1.05 to 1.57. 664 patients), whereas patients who underwent randomization more than 10 days after the onset of symptoms had a rate ratio for recovery of 1.38 (95% CI, 1.05 to 1.81.

380 patients) (Figure where to buy diflucan pills 3). Key Secondary Outcome The odds of improvement in the ordinal scale score were higher in the remdesivir group, as determined by a proportional odds model at the day 15 visit, than in the placebo group (odds ratio for improvement, 1.50. 95% CI, 1.18 to 1.91. P=0.001.

844 patients) (Table 2 and Fig. S5). Mortality was numerically lower in the remdesivir group than in the placebo group, but the difference was not significant (hazard ratio for death, 0.70. 95% CI, 0.47 to 1.04.

1059 patients). The Kaplan–Meier estimates of mortality by 14 days were 7.1% and 11.9% in the remdesivir and placebo groups, respectively (Table 2). The Kaplan–Meier estimates of mortality by 28 days are not reported in this preliminary analysis, given the large number of patients that had yet to complete day 29 visits. An analysis with adjustment for baseline ordinal score as a stratification variable showed a hazard ratio for death of 0.74 (95% CI, 0.50 to 1.10).

Safety Outcomes Serious adverse events occurred in 114 patients (21.1%) in the remdesivir group and 141 patients (27.0%) in the placebo group (Table S3). 4 events (2 in each group) were judged by site investigators to be related to remdesivir or placebo. There were 28 serious respiratory failure adverse events in the remdesivir group (5.2% of patients) and 42 in the placebo group (8.0% of patients). Acute respiratory failure, hypotension, viral pneumonia, and acute kidney injury were slightly more common among patients in the placebo group.

No deaths were considered to be related to treatment assignment, as judged by the site investigators. Grade 3 or 4 adverse events occurred in 156 patients (28.8%) in the remdesivir group and in 172 in the placebo group (33.0%) (Table S4). The most common adverse events in the remdesivir group were anemia or decreased hemoglobin (43 events [7.9%], as compared with 47 [9.0%] in the placebo group). Acute kidney injury, decreased estimated glomerular filtration rate or creatinine clearance, or increased blood creatinine (40 events [7.4%], as compared with 38 [7.3%]).

Pyrexia (27 events [5.0%], as compared with 17 [3.3%]). Hyperglycemia or increased blood glucose level (22 events [4.1%], as compared with 17 [3.3%]). And increased aminotransferase levels including alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, or both (22 events [4.1%], as compared with 31 [5.9%]). Otherwise, the incidence of adverse events was not found to be significantly different between the remdesivir group and the placebo group.Trial Population Table 1.

Table 1. Characteristics of the Participants in the mRNA-1273 Trial at Enrollment. The 45 enrolled participants received their first vaccination between March 16 and April 14, 2020 (Fig. S1).

Three participants did not receive the second vaccination, including one in the 25-μg group who had urticaria on both legs, with onset 5 days after the first vaccination, and two (one in the 25-μg group and one in the 250-μg group) who missed the second vaccination window owing to isolation for suspected Covid-19 while the test results, ultimately negative, were pending. All continued to attend scheduled trial visits. The demographic characteristics of participants at enrollment are provided in Table 1. Vaccine Safety No serious adverse events were noted, and no prespecified trial halting rules were met.

As noted above, one participant in the 25-μg group was withdrawn because of an unsolicited adverse event, transient urticaria, judged to be related to the first vaccination. Figure 1. Figure 1. Systemic and Local Adverse Events.

The severity of solicited adverse events was graded as mild, moderate, or severe (see Table S1).After the first vaccination, solicited systemic adverse events were reported by 5 participants (33%) in the 25-μg group, 10 (67%) in the 100-μg group, and 8 (53%) in the 250-μg group. All were mild or moderate in severity (Figure 1 and Table S2). Solicited systemic adverse events were more common after the second vaccination and occurred in 7 of 13 participants (54%) in the 25-μg group, all 15 in the 100-μg group, and all 14 in the 250-μg group, with 3 of those participants (21%) reporting one or more severe events. None of the participants had fever after the first vaccination.

After the second vaccination, no participants in the 25-μg group, 6 (40%) in the 100-μg group, and 8 (57%) in the 250-μg group reported fever. One of the events (maximum temperature, 39.6°C) in the 250-μg group was graded severe. (Additional details regarding adverse events for that participant are provided in the Supplementary Appendix.) Local adverse events, when present, were nearly all mild or moderate, and pain at the injection site was common. Across both vaccinations, solicited systemic and local adverse events that occurred in more than half the participants included fatigue, chills, headache, myalgia, and pain at the injection site.

Evaluation of safety clinical laboratory values of grade 2 or higher and unsolicited adverse events revealed no patterns of concern (Supplementary Appendix and Table S3). SARS-CoV-2 Binding Antibody Responses Table 2. Table 2. Geometric Mean Humoral Immunogenicity Assay Responses to mRNA-1273 in Participants and in Convalescent Serum Specimens.

Figure 2. Figure 2. SARS-CoV-2 Antibody and Neutralization Responses. Shown are geometric mean reciprocal end-point enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) IgG titers to S-2P (Panel A) and receptor-binding domain (Panel B), PsVNA ID50 responses (Panel C), and live virus PRNT80 responses (Panel D).

In Panel A and Panel B, boxes and horizontal bars denote interquartile range (IQR) and median area under the curve (AUC), respectively. Whisker endpoints are equal to the maximum and minimum values below or above the median ±1.5 times the IQR. The convalescent serum panel includes specimens from 41 participants. Red dots indicate the 3 specimens that were also tested in the PRNT assay.

The other 38 specimens were used to calculate summary statistics for the box plot in the convalescent serum panel. In Panel C, boxes and horizontal bars denote IQR and median ID50, respectively. Whisker end points are equal to the maximum and minimum values below or above the median ±1.5 times the IQR. In the convalescent serum panel, red dots indicate the 3 specimens that were also tested in the PRNT assay.

The other 38 specimens were used to calculate summary statistics for the box plot in the convalescent panel. In Panel D, boxes and horizontal bars denote IQR and median PRNT80, respectively. Whisker end points are equal to the maximum and minimum values below or above the median ±1.5 times the IQR. The three convalescent serum specimens were also tested in ELISA and PsVNA assays.

Because of the time-intensive nature of the PRNT assay, for this preliminary report, PRNT results were available only for the 25-μg and 100-μg dose groups.Binding antibody IgG geometric mean titers (GMTs) to S-2P increased rapidly after the first vaccination, with seroconversion in all participants by day 15 (Table 2 and Figure 2A). Dose-dependent responses to the first and second vaccinations were evident. Receptor-binding domain–specific antibody responses were similar in pattern and magnitude (Figure 2B). For both assays, the median magnitude of antibody responses after the first vaccination in the 100-μg and 250-μg dose groups was similar to the median magnitude in convalescent serum specimens, and in all dose groups the median magnitude after the second vaccination was in the upper quartile of values in the convalescent serum specimens.

The S-2P ELISA GMTs at day 57 (299,751 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 206,071 to 436,020] in the 25-μg group, 782,719 [95% CI, 619,310 to 989,244] in the 100-μg group, and 1,192,154 [95% CI, 924,878 to 1,536,669] in the 250-μg group) exceeded that in the convalescent serum specimens (142,140 [95% CI, 81,543 to 247,768]). SARS-CoV-2 Neutralization Responses No participant had detectable PsVNA responses before vaccination. After the first vaccination, PsVNA responses were detected in less than half the participants, and a dose effect was seen (50% inhibitory dilution [ID50]. Figure 2C, Fig.

S8, and Table 2. 80% inhibitory dilution [ID80]. Fig. S2 and Table S6).

However, after the second vaccination, PsVNA responses were identified in serum samples from all participants. The lowest responses were in the 25-μg dose group, with a geometric mean ID50 of 112.3 (95% CI, 71.2 to 177.1) at day 43. The higher responses in the 100-μg and 250-μg groups were similar in magnitude (geometric mean ID50, 343.8 [95% CI, 261.2 to 452.7] and 332.2 [95% CI, 266.3 to 414.5], respectively, at day 43). These responses were similar to values in the upper half of the distribution of values for convalescent serum specimens.

Before vaccination, no participant had detectable 80% live-virus neutralization at the highest serum concentration tested (1:8 dilution) in the PRNT assay. At day 43, wild-type virus–neutralizing activity capable of reducing SARS-CoV-2 infectivity by 80% or more (PRNT80) was detected in all participants, with geometric mean PRNT80 responses of 339.7 (95% CI, 184.0 to 627.1) in the 25-μg group and 654.3 (95% CI, 460.1 to 930.5) in the 100-μg group (Figure 2D). Neutralizing PRNT80 average responses were generally at or above the values of the three convalescent serum specimens tested in this assay. Good agreement was noted within and between the values from binding assays for S-2P and receptor-binding domain and neutralizing activity measured by PsVNA and PRNT (Figs.

S3 through S7), which provides orthogonal support for each assay in characterizing the humoral response induced by mRNA-1273. SARS-CoV-2 T-Cell Responses The 25-μg and 100-μg doses elicited CD4 T-cell responses (Figs. S9 and S10) that on stimulation by S-specific peptide pools were strongly biased toward expression of Th1 cytokines (tumor necrosis factor α >. Interleukin 2 >.

Interferon γ), with minimal type 2 helper T-cell (Th2) cytokine expression (interleukin 4 and interleukin 13). CD8 T-cell responses to S-2P were detected at low levels after the second vaccination in the 100-μg dose group (Fig. S11).Trial Design and Oversight The RECOVERY trial was designed to evaluate the effects of potential treatments in patients hospitalized with Covid-19 at 176 National Health Service organizations in the United Kingdom and was supported by the National Institute for Health Research Clinical Research Network. (Details regarding this trial are provided in the Supplementary Appendix, available with the full text of this article at NEJM.org.) The trial is being coordinated by the Nuffield Department of Population Health at the University of Oxford, the trial sponsor.

Although the randomization of patients to receive dexamethasone, hydroxychloroquine, or lopinavir–ritonavir has now been stopped, the trial continues randomization to groups receiving azithromycin, tocilizumab, or convalescent plasma. Hospitalized patients were eligible for the trial if they had clinically suspected or laboratory-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection and no medical history that might, in the opinion of the attending clinician, put patients at substantial risk if they were to participate in the trial. Initially, recruitment was limited to patients who were at least 18 years of age, but the age limit was removed starting on May 9, 2020. Pregnant or breast-feeding women were eligible.

Written informed consent was obtained from all the patients or from a legal representative if they were unable to provide consent. The trial was conducted in accordance with the principles of the Good Clinical Practice guidelines of the International Conference on Harmonisation and was approved by the U.K. Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency and the Cambridge East Research Ethics Committee. The protocol with its statistical analysis plan is available at NEJM.org and on the trial website at www.recoverytrial.net.

The initial version of the manuscript was drafted by the first and last authors, developed by the writing committee, and approved by all members of the trial steering committee. The funders had no role in the analysis of the data, in the preparation or approval of the manuscript, or in the decision to submit the manuscript for publication. The first and last members of the writing committee vouch for the completeness and accuracy of the data and for the fidelity of the trial to the protocol and statistical analysis plan. Randomization We collected baseline data using a Web-based case-report form that included demographic data, the level of respiratory support, major coexisting illnesses, suitability of the trial treatment for a particular patient, and treatment availability at the trial site.

Randomization was performed with the use of a Web-based system with concealment of the trial-group assignment. Eligible and consenting patients were assigned in a 2:1 ratio to receive either the usual standard of care alone or the usual standard of care plus oral or intravenous dexamethasone (at a dose of 6 mg once daily) for up to 10 days (or until hospital discharge if sooner) or to receive one of the other suitable and available treatments that were being evaluated in the trial. For some patients, dexamethasone was unavailable at the hospital at the time of enrollment or was considered by the managing physician to be either definitely indicated or definitely contraindicated. These patients were excluded from entry in the randomized comparison between dexamethasone and usual care and hence were not included in this report.

The randomly assigned treatment was prescribed by the treating clinician. Patients and local members of the trial staff were aware of the assigned treatments. Procedures A single online follow-up form was to be completed when the patients were discharged or had died or at 28 days after randomization, whichever occurred first. Information was recorded regarding the patients’ adherence to the assigned treatment, receipt of other trial treatments, duration of admission, receipt of respiratory support (with duration and type), receipt of renal support, and vital status (including the cause of death).

In addition, we obtained routine health care and registry data, including information on vital status (with date and cause of death), discharge from the hospital, and respiratory and renal support therapy. Outcome Measures The primary outcome was all-cause mortality within 28 days after randomization. Further analyses were specified at 6 months. Secondary outcomes were the time until discharge from the hospital and, among patients not receiving invasive mechanical ventilation at the time of randomization, subsequent receipt of invasive mechanical ventilation (including extracorporeal membrane oxygenation) or death.

Other prespecified clinical outcomes included cause-specific mortality, receipt of renal hemodialysis or hemofiltration, major cardiac arrhythmia (recorded in a subgroup), and receipt and duration of ventilation. Statistical Analysis As stated in the protocol, appropriate sample sizes could not be estimated when the trial was being planned at the start of the Covid-19 pandemic. As the trial progressed, the trial steering committee, whose members were unaware of the results of the trial comparisons, determined that if 28-day mortality was 20%, then the enrollment of at least 2000 patients in the dexamethasone group and 4000 in the usual care group would provide a power of at least 90% at a two-sided P value of 0.01 to detect a clinically relevant proportional reduction of 20% (an absolute difference of 4 percentage points) between the two groups. Consequently, on June 8, 2020, the steering committee closed recruitment to the dexamethasone group, since enrollment had exceeded 2000 patients.

For the primary outcome of 28-day mortality, the hazard ratio from Cox regression was used to estimate the mortality rate ratio. Among the few patients (0.1%) who had not been followed for 28 days by the time of the data cutoff on July 6, 2020, data were censored either on that date or on day 29 if the patient had already been discharged. That is, in the absence of any information to the contrary, these patients were assumed to have survived for 28 days. Kaplan–Meier survival curves were constructed to show cumulative mortality over the 28-day period.

Cox regression was used to analyze the secondary outcome of hospital discharge within 28 days, with censoring of data on day 29 for patients who had died during hospitalization. For the prespecified composite secondary outcome of invasive mechanical ventilation or death within 28 days (among patients who were not receiving invasive mechanical ventilation at randomization), the precise date of invasive mechanical ventilation was not available, so a log-binomial regression model was used to estimate the risk ratio. Table 1. Table 1.

Characteristics of the Patients at Baseline, According to Treatment Assignment and Level of Respiratory Support. Through the play of chance in the unstratified randomization, the mean age was 1.1 years older among patients in the dexamethasone group than among those in the usual care group (Table 1). To account for this imbalance in an important prognostic factor, estimates of rate ratios were adjusted for the baseline age in three categories (<70 years, 70 to 79 years, and ≥80 years). This adjustment was not specified in the first version of the statistical analysis plan but was added once the imbalance in age became apparent.

Results without age adjustment (corresponding to the first version of the analysis plan) are provided in the Supplementary Appendix. Prespecified analyses of the primary outcome were performed in five subgroups, as defined by characteristics at randomization. Age, sex, level of respiratory support, days since symptom onset, and predicted 28-day mortality risk. (One further prespecified subgroup analysis regarding race will be conducted once the data collection has been completed.) In prespecified subgroups, we estimated rate ratios (or risk ratios in some analyses) and their confidence intervals using regression models that included an interaction term between the treatment assignment and the subgroup of interest.

Chi-square tests for linear trend across the subgroup-specific log estimates were then performed in accordance with the prespecified plan. All P values are two-sided and are shown without adjustment for multiple testing. All analyses were performed according to the intention-to-treat principle. The full database is held by the trial team, which collected the data from trial sites and performed the analyses at the Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford.Trial Design and Oversight We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to evaluate postexposure prophylaxis with hydroxychloroquine after exposure to Covid-19.12 We randomly assigned participants in a 1:1 ratio to receive either hydroxychloroquine or placebo.

Participants had known exposure (by participant report) to a person with laboratory-confirmed Covid-19, whether as a household contact, a health care worker, or a person with other occupational exposures. Trial enrollment began on March 17, 2020, with an eligibility threshold to enroll within 3 days after exposure. The objective was to intervene before the median incubation period of 5 to 6 days. Because of limited access to prompt testing, health care workers could initially be enrolled on the basis of presumptive high-risk exposure to patients with pending tests.

However, on March 23, eligibility was changed to exposure to a person with a positive polymerase-chain-reaction (PCR) assay for SARS-CoV-2, with the eligibility window extended to within 4 days after exposure. This trial was approved by the institutional review board at the University of Minnesota and conducted under a Food and Drug Administration Investigational New Drug application. In Canada, the trial was approved by Health Canada. Ethics approvals were obtained from the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, the University of Manitoba, and the University of Alberta.

Participants We included participants who had household or occupational exposure to a person with confirmed Covid-19 at a distance of less than 6 ft for more than 10 minutes while wearing neither a face mask nor an eye shield (high-risk exposure) or while wearing a face mask but no eye shield (moderate-risk exposure). Participants were excluded if they were younger than 18 years of age, were hospitalized, or met other exclusion criteria (see the Supplementary Appendix, available with the full text of this article at NEJM.org). Persons with symptoms of Covid-19 or with PCR-proven SARS-CoV-2 infection were excluded from this prevention trial but were separately enrolled in a companion clinical trial to treat early infection. Setting Recruitment was performed primarily with the use of social media outreach as well as traditional media platforms.

Participants were enrolled nationwide in the United States and in the Canadian provinces of Quebec, Manitoba, and Alberta. Participants enrolled themselves through a secure Internet-based survey using the Research Electronic Data Capture (REDCap) system.13 After participants read the consent form, their comprehension of its contents was assessed. Participants provided a digitally captured signature to indicate informed consent. We sent follow-up e-mail surveys on days 1, 5, 10, and 14.

A survey at 4 to 6 weeks asked about any follow-up testing, illness, or hospitalizations. Participants who did not respond to follow-up surveys received text messages, e-mails, telephone calls, or a combination of these to ascertain their outcomes. When these methods were unsuccessful, the emergency contact provided by the enrollee was contacted to determine the participant’s illness and vital status. When all communication methods were exhausted, Internet searches for obituaries were performed to ascertain vital status.

Interventions Randomization occurred at research pharmacies in Minneapolis and Montreal. The trial statisticians generated a permuted-block randomization sequence using variably sized blocks of 2, 4, or 8, with stratification according to country. A research pharmacist sequentially assigned participants. The assignments were concealed from investigators and participants.

Only pharmacies had access to the randomization sequence. Hydroxychloroquine sulfate or placebo was dispensed and shipped overnight to participants by commercial courier. The dosing regimen for hydroxychloroquine was 800 mg (4 tablets) once, then 600 mg (3 tablets) 6 to 8 hours later, then 600 mg (3 tablets) daily for 4 more days for a total course of 5 days (19 tablets total). If participants had gastrointestinal upset, they were advised to divide the daily dose into two or three doses.

We chose this hydroxychloroquine dosing regimen on the basis of pharmacokinetic simulations to achieve plasma concentrations above the SARS-CoV-2 in vitro half maximal effective concentration for 14 days.14 Placebo folate tablets, which were similar in appearance to the hydroxychloroquine tablets, were prescribed as an identical regimen for the control group. Rising Pharmaceuticals provided a donation of hydroxychloroquine, and some hydroxychloroquine was purchased. Outcomes The primary outcome was prespecified as symptomatic illness confirmed by a positive molecular assay or, if testing was unavailable, Covid-19–related symptoms. We assumed that health care workers would have access to Covid-19 testing if symptomatic.

However, access to testing was limited throughout the trial period. Covid-19–related symptoms were based on U.S. Council for State and Territorial Epidemiologists criteria for confirmed cases (positivity for SARS-Cov-2 on PCR assay), probable cases (the presence of cough, shortness of breath, or difficulty breathing, or the presence of two or more symptoms of fever, chills, rigors, myalgia, headache, sore throat, and new olfactory and taste disorders), and possible cases (the presence of one or more compatible symptoms, which could include diarrhea).15 All the participants had epidemiologic linkage,15 per trial eligibility criteria. Four infectious disease physicians who were unaware of the trial-group assignments reviewed symptomatic participants to generate a consensus with respect to whether their condition met the case definition.15 Secondary outcomes included the incidence of hospitalization for Covid-19 or death, the incidence of PCR-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection, the incidence of Covid-19 symptoms, the incidence of discontinuation of the trial intervention owing to any cause, and the severity of symptoms (if any) at days 5 and 14 according to a visual analogue scale (scores ranged from 0 [no symptoms] to 10 [severe symptoms]).

Data on adverse events were also collected with directed questioning for common side effects along with open-ended free text. Outcome data were measured within 14 days after trial enrollment. Outcome data including PCR testing results, possible Covid-19–related symptoms, adherence to the trial intervention, side effects, and hospitalizations were all collected through participant report. Details of trial conduct are provided in the protocol and statistical analysis plan, available at NEJM.org.

Sample Size We anticipated that illness compatible with Covid-19 would develop in 10% of close contacts exposed to Covid-19.9 Using Fisher’s exact method with a 50% relative effect size to reduce new symptomatic infections, a two-sided alpha of 0.05, and 90% power, we estimated that 621 persons would need to be enrolled in each group. With a pragmatic, Internet-based, self-referral recruitment strategy, we planned for a 20% incidence of attrition by increasing the sample size to 750 participants per group. We specified a priori that participants who were already symptomatic on day 1 before receiving hydroxychloroquine or placebo would be excluded from the prophylaxis trial and would instead be separately enrolled in the companion symptomatic treatment trial. Because the estimates for both incident symptomatic Covid-19 after an exposure and loss to follow-up were relatively unknown in early March 2020,9 the protocol prespecified a sample-size reestimation at the second interim analysis.

This reestimation, which used the incidence of new infections in the placebo group and the observed percentage of participants lost to follow-up, was aimed at maintaining the ability to detect an effect size of a 50% relative reduction in new symptomatic infections. Interim Analyses An independent data and safety monitoring board externally reviewed the data after 25% and 50% of the participants had completed 14 days of follow-up. Stopping guidelines were provided to the data and safety monitoring board with the use of a Lan–DeMets spending function analogue of the O’Brien–Fleming boundaries for the primary outcome. A conditional power analysis was performed at the second and third interim analysis with the option of early stopping for futility.

At the second interim analysis on April 22, 2020, the sample size was reduced to 956 participants who could be evaluated with 90% power on the basis of the higher-than-expected event rate of infections in the control group. At the third interim analysis on May 6, the trial was halted on the basis of a conditional power of less than 1%, since it was deemed futile to continue. Statistical Analysis We assessed the incidence of Covid-19 disease by day 14 with Fisher’s exact test. Secondary outcomes with respect to percentage of patients were also compared with Fisher’s exact test.

Among participants in whom incident illness compatible with Covid-19 developed, we summarized the symptom severity score at day 14 with the median and interquartile range and assessed the distributions with a Kruskal–Wallis test. We conducted all analyses with SAS software, version 9.4 (SAS Institute), according to the intention-to-treat principle, with two-sided type I error with an alpha of 0.05. For participants with missing outcome data, we conducted a sensitivity analysis with their outcomes excluded or included as an event. Subgroups that were specified a priori included type of contact (household vs.

Health care), days from exposure to enrollment, age, and sex.Announced on May 15, Operation Warp Speed (OWS) — a partnership of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), the Department of Defense (DOD), and the private sector — aims to accelerate control of the Covid-19 pandemic by advancing development, manufacturing, and distribution of vaccines, therapeutics, and diagnostics. OWS is providing support to promising candidates and enabling the expeditious, parallel execution of the necessary steps toward approval or authorization of safe products by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).The partnership grew out of an acknowledged need to fundamentally restructure the way the U.S. Government typically supports product development and vaccine distribution. The initiative was premised on setting a “stretch goal” — one that initially seemed impossible but that is becoming increasingly achievable.The concept of an integrated structure for Covid-19 countermeasure research and development across the U.S.

Government was based on experience with Zika and the Zika Leadership Group led by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the assistant secretary for preparedness and response (ASPR). One of us (M.S.) serves as OWS chief advisor. We are drawing on expertise from the NIH, ASPR, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA), and the DOD, including the Joint Program Executive Office for Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Defense and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. OWS has engaged experts in all critical aspects of medical countermeasure research, development, manufacturing, and distribution to work in close coordination.The initiative set ambitious objectives.

To deliver tens of millions of doses of a SARS-CoV-2 vaccine — with demonstrated safety and efficacy, and approved or authorized by the FDA for use in the U.S. Population — beginning at the end of 2020 and to have as many as 300 million doses of such vaccines available and deployed by mid-2021. The pace and scope of such a vaccine effort are unprecedented. The 2014 West African Ebola virus epidemic spurred rapid vaccine development, but though preclinical data existed before the outbreak, a period of 12 months was required to progress from phase 1 first-in-human trials to phase 3 efficacy trials.

OWS aims to compress this time frame even further. SARS-CoV-2 vaccine development began in January, phase 1 clinical studies in March, and the first phase 3 trials in July. Our objectives are based on advances in vaccine platform technology, improved understanding of safe and efficacious vaccine design, and similarities between the SARS-CoV-1 and SARS-CoV-2 disease mechanisms.OWS’s role is to enable, accelerate, harmonize, and advise the companies developing the selected vaccines. The companies will execute the clinical or process development and manufacturing plans, while OWS leverages the full capacity of the U.S.

Government to ensure that no technical, logistic, or financial hurdles hinder vaccine development or deployment.OWS selected vaccine candidates on the basis of four criteria. We required candidates to have robust preclinical data or early-stage clinical trial data supporting their potential for clinical safety and efficacy. Candidates had to have the potential, with our acceleration support, to enter large phase 3 field efficacy trials this summer or fall (July to November 2020) and, assuming continued active transmission of the virus, to deliver efficacy outcomes by the end of 2020 or the first half of 2021. Candidates had to be based on vaccine-platform technologies permitting fast and effective manufacturing, and their developers had to demonstrate the industrial process scalability, yields, and consistency necessary to reliably produce more than 100 million doses by mid-2021.

Finally, candidates had to use one of four vaccine-platform technologies that we believe are the most likely to yield a safe and effective vaccine against Covid-19. The mRNA platform, the replication-defective live-vector platform, the recombinant-subunit-adjuvanted protein platform, or the attenuated replicating live-vector platform.OWS’s strategy relies on a few key principles. First, we sought to build a diverse project portfolio that includes two vaccine candidates based on each of the four platform technologies. Such diversification mitigates the risk of failure due to safety, efficacy, industrial manufacturability, or scheduling factors and may permit selection of the best vaccine platform for each subpopulation at risk for contracting or transmitting Covid-19, including older adults, frontline and essential workers, young adults, and pediatric populations.

In addition, advancing eight vaccines in parallel will increase the chances of delivering 300 million doses in the first half of 2021.Second, we must accelerate vaccine program development without compromising safety, efficacy, or product quality. Clinical development, process development, and manufacturing scale-up can be substantially accelerated by running all streams, fully resourced, in parallel. Doing so requires taking on substantial financial risk, as compared with the conventional sequential development approach. OWS will maximize the size of phase 3 trials (30,000 to 50,000 participants each) and optimize trial-site location by consulting daily epidemiologic and disease-forecasting models to ensure the fastest path to an efficacy readout.

Such large trials also increase the safety data set for each candidate vaccine.With heavy up-front investment, companies can conduct clinical operations and site preparation for these phase 3 efficacy trials even as they file their Investigational New Drug application (IND) for their phase 1 studies, thereby ensuring immediate initiation of phase 3 when they get a green light from the FDA. To permit appropriate comparisons among the vaccine candidates and to optimize vaccine utilization after approval by the FDA, the phase 3 trial end points and assay readouts have been harmonized through a collaborative effort involving the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), the Coronavirus Prevention Network, OWS, and the sponsor companies.Finally, OWS is supporting the companies financially and technically to commence process development and scale up manufacturing while their vaccines are in preclinical or very early clinical stages. To ensure that industrial processes are set, running, and validated for FDA inspection when phase 3 trials end, OWS is also supporting facility building or refurbishing, equipment fitting, staff hiring and training, raw-material sourcing, technology transfer and validation, bulk product processing into vials, and acquisition of ample vials, syringes, and needles for each vaccine candidate. We aim to have stockpiled, at OWS’s expense, a few tens of millions of vaccine doses that could be swiftly deployed once FDA approval is obtained.This strategy aims to accelerate vaccine development without curtailing the critical steps required by sound science and regulatory standards.

The FDA recently reissued guidance and standards that will be used to assess each vaccine for a Biologics License Application (BLA). Alternatively, the agency could decide to issue an Emergency Use Authorization to permit vaccine administration before all BLA procedures are completed.Of the eight vaccines in OWS’s portfolio, six have been announced and partnerships executed with the companies. Moderna and Pfizer/BioNTech (both mRNA), AstraZeneca and Janssen (both replication-defective live-vector), and Novavax and Sanofi/GSK (both recombinant-subunit-adjuvanted protein). These candidates cover three of the four platform technologies and are currently in clinical trials.

The remaining two candidates will enter trials soon.Moderna developed its RNA vaccine in collaboration with the NIAID, began its phase 1 trial in March, recently published encouraging safety and immunogenicity data,1 and entered phase 3 on July 27. Pfizer and BioNTech’s RNA vaccine also produced encouraging phase 1 results2 and started its phase 3 trial on July 27. The ChAdOx replication-defective live-vector vaccine developed by AstraZeneca and Oxford University is in phase 3 trials in the United Kingdom, Brazil, and South Africa, and it should enter U.S. Phase 3 trials in August.3 The Janssen Ad26 Covid-19 replication-defective live-vector vaccine has demonstrated excellent protection in nonhuman primate models and began its U.S.

Phase 1 trial on July 27. It should be in phase 3 trials in mid-September. Novavax completed a phase 1 trial of its recombinant-subunit-adjuvanted protein vaccine in Australia and should enter phase 3 trials in the United States by the end of September.4 Sanofi/GSK is completing preclinical development steps and plans to commence a phase 1 trial in early September and to be well into phase 3 by year’s end.5On the process-development front, the RNA vaccines are already being manufactured at scale. The other candidates are well advanced in their scale-up development, and manufacturing sites are being refurbished.While development and manufacturing proceed, the HHS–DOD partnership is laying the groundwork for vaccine distribution, subpopulation prioritization, financing, and logistic support.

We are working with bioethicists and experts from the NIH, the CDC, BARDA, and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services to address these critical issues. We will receive recommendations from the CDC Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, and we are working to ensure that the most vulnerable and at-risk persons will receive vaccine doses once they are ready. Prioritization will also depend on the relative performance of each vaccine and its suitability for particular populations. Because some technologies have limited previous data on safety in humans, the long-term safety of these vaccines will be carefully assessed using pharmacovigilance surveillance strategies.No scientific enterprise could guarantee success by January 2021, but the strategic decisions and choices we’ve made, the support the government has provided, and the accomplishments to date make us optimistic that we will succeed in this unprecedented endeavor..

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As rural areas diflucan prescription only lose physicians and hospitals, home health agencies often replace primary care providers. The average age of residents living in rural counties is seven years older than in urban counties, and this gap is growing. The need for home health agencies serving the elderly in rural areas will continue to grow over the coming decades.Rural home health agencies face unique challenges. Low concentrations of people are dispersed over large geographic areas diflucan prescription only leading to long travel times for workers to drive to clients’ homes.

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With a 5% add-on, Medicare would pay $67.78 for an aide home visit in a city and $71.17 for the same care in a rural area.Home health care workers serve a particularly important role in rural areas. As rural areas lose physicians and hospitals, home health agencies often replace primary care providers.Rural add-on payments have fluctuated based on Congressional budgets and political priorities. From 2003 to 2019, the amount Medicare paid agencies diflucan prescription only changed eight times. For instance, the add-on dropped from 10% to nothing in April 2003.

Then, in diflucan prescription only April 2004, Congress set the rural add-on to 5%.The variation in payments created a natural experiment for researchers. Tracy Mroz and colleagues assessed how rural add-ons affected the supply of home health agencies in rural areas. They asked if the number of agencies in urban and rural counties varied depending on the presence and dollar amount of rural add-ons between 2002 and 2018. Though rural add-ons have been in place for over 30 years, researchers had not previously investigated their effect on the diflucan prescription only availability of home healthcare.The researchers found that rural areas adjacent to urban areas were not affected by rural add-ons.

They had similar supply to urban areas whether or not add-ons were in place. In contrast, isolated rural areas diflucan prescription only were affected substantially by add-ons. Without add-ons, the number of agencies in isolated rural areas lagged behind those in urban areas. When the add-ons were at least 5%, the availability of home health in isolated rural areas was comparable to diflucan prescription only urban areas.In 2020, Congress implemented a system of payment reform that reimburses home health agencies in rural counties by population density and home health use.

Under the new system, counties with low population densities and low home health use will receive the greatest rural add-on payments. These payments aim to increase and maintain the availability of care in the most vulnerable rural home health markets. Time will tell if this approach gives sufficient incentive to ensure access to quality care in the nation’s most isolated areas.Photo diflucan prescription only via Getty ImagesStart Preamble Correction In proposed rule document 2020-13792 beginning on page 39408 in the issue of Tuesday, June 30, 2020, make the following correction. On page 39408, in the first column, in the DATES section, “August 31, 2020” should read “August 24, 2020”.

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The average age of residents living in rural counties is seven years older than in urban counties, and this gap is growing. The need for home health agencies serving the elderly in rural areas will continue to grow over the coming decades.Rural home health agencies face unique challenges. Low concentrations of people where to buy diflucan pills are dispersed over large geographic areas leading to long travel times for workers to drive to clients’ homes. Agencies in rural areas also have difficulties recruiting and maintaining a workforce. Due to these difficulties, agencies may not be able to serve where to buy diflucan pills all rural beneficiaries, initiate care on time, or deliver all covered services.Congress has supported measures to encourage home health agencies to work in rural areas since the 1980s by using rural add-on payments.

A rural add-on is a percentage increase on top of per visit and episode-of-care payments. When a home health aide works in a where to buy diflucan pills rural county, Medicare pays their home health agency a standard fee plus a rural add-on. With a 5% add-on, Medicare would pay $67.78 for an aide home visit in a city and $71.17 for the same care in a rural area.Home health care workers serve a particularly important role in rural areas. As rural areas lose physicians and hospitals, home health agencies often replace primary care providers.Rural add-on payments have fluctuated based on Congressional budgets and political priorities. From 2003 to where to buy diflucan pills 2019, the amount Medicare paid agencies changed eight times.

For instance, the add-on dropped from 10% to nothing in April 2003. Then, in April 2004, Congress set the rural add-on to where to buy diflucan pills 5%.The variation in payments created a natural experiment for researchers. Tracy Mroz and colleagues assessed how rural add-ons affected the supply of home health agencies in rural areas. They asked if the number of agencies in urban and rural counties varied depending on the presence and dollar amount of rural add-ons between 2002 and 2018. Though rural add-ons have been in place for over 30 years, researchers had not previously where to buy diflucan pills investigated their effect on the availability of home healthcare.The researchers found that rural areas adjacent to urban areas were not affected by rural add-ons.

They had similar supply to urban areas whether or not add-ons were in place. In contrast, isolated rural areas where to buy diflucan pills were affected substantially by add-ons. Without add-ons, the number of agencies in isolated rural areas lagged behind those in urban areas. When the add-ons were at least 5%, the availability of home health in isolated rural areas was comparable to urban areas.In 2020, Congress where to buy diflucan pills implemented a system of payment reform that reimburses home health agencies in rural counties by population density and home health use. Under the new system, counties with low population densities and low home health use will receive the greatest rural add-on payments.

These payments aim to increase and maintain the availability of care in the most vulnerable rural home health markets. Time will tell if this approach gives sufficient incentive to ensure access to quality care in the nation’s most isolated areas.Photo via Getty ImagesStart Preamble Correction In proposed rule document 2020-13792 beginning on page 39408 in the issue of Tuesday, June 30, 2020, make the following correction where to buy diflucan pills. On page 39408, in the first column, in the DATES section, “August 31, 2020” should read “August 24, 2020”. End Preamble where to buy diflucan pills [FR Doc. C1-2020-13792 Filed 7-17-20.

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Have you ever woken up with a sore throat diflucan prostatitis and used your phone to get a virtual visit?. The odds are it’s not available to you, and there is a reason for that. You may be hearing about how virtual care, often described as telehealth or telemedicine, is beneficial during COVID-19 and how health systems are offering virtual access like never before. There’s a reason for that, diflucan prostatitis too.

For the past few weeks I’ve seen Facebook posts daily from former nursing colleagues in metro Detroit, one of the hardest hit areas in the country, as they provide front-line care to patients with COVID-19. It makes me very proud to call these nurses my friends. As a former emergency department nurse, I recall the feeling of satisfaction knowing that I’ve helped someone on diflucan prostatitis the worst day of their life. One of the best parts of being a nurse is knowing you matter to the only person in health care that truly matters.

The patient. Several years ago I made the difficult decision to no longer perform bedside nursing and diflucan prostatitis become a nurse administrator. The biggest loss from my transition is the feeling that what I do matters to the patient. COVID-19 has forced a lot of us to rethink the role we play in health care and what the real priority should be.

Things that were top priorities three months ago have been rightfully cast aside to either care for patients in a pandemic or prepare for the unknown diflucan prostatitis future of, “When is our turn?. € For me, COVID-19 has reignited the feeling that what I do matters as virtual care has become a powerful tool on the forefront of care during this crisis. It has also shown that many of the powerful rules and regulations that limit virtual care are not needed and should be discarded permanently. When I became the director diflucan prostatitis of virtual care at our organization in 2015 I knew nothing about telehealth.

Sure, I had seen a stroke robot in some Emergency Departments, and I had some friends that told me their insurance company lets them FaceTime a doctor for free (spoiler alert. It’s not FaceTime). I was tech-savvy from a consumer diflucan prostatitis perspective and a tech novice from an IT perspective. Nevertheless, my team and I spent the next few years learning as we built one of the higher volume virtual care networks in the state of Michigan.

We discovered a lot of barriers that keep virtual care from actually making the lives of patients and providers better and we also became experts in working around those barriers. But, diflucan prostatitis there were two obstacles that we could not overcome. Government regulation and insurance provider willingness to cover virtual visits. These two barriers effectively cripple most legitimate attempts to provide value-added direct-to-consumer virtual care, which I define as using virtual care technologies to provide care outside of our brick-and-mortar facilities, most commonly in the patient home.

The need to social distance, cancel appointments, close provider offices, keep from overloading emergency departments and urgent diflucan prostatitis cares and shelter in place created instant demand for direct-to-consumer virtual care. In all honesty, I’ve always considered direct-to-consumer virtual care to be the flashy, must-have holiday gift of the year that organizations are convinced will be the way of the future. If a health system wants to provide on-demand access to patients for low-complexity acute conditions, they will easily find plenty of vendors that will sell them their app and their doctors and put the health system’s logo on it. What a health system will struggle with is to find is enough patient demand to cover the high diflucan prostatitis cost.

Remember my friends from earlier that told me about the app their insurance gave them?. Nearly all of them followed that up by telling me they’ve never actually used it. I am fortunate that I work for an organization that understands this and instead focuses on how can we provide care that diflucan prostatitis our patients actually want and need from the doctors they want to see. Ironically, this fiscal year we had a corporate top priority around direct-to-consumer virtual care.

We wanted to expand what we thought were some successful pilots and perform 500 direct-to-consumer visits. This year has been one of the hardest of my leadership career because, frankly, diflucan prostatitis up until a month ago I was about to fail on this top priority. With only four months left, we were only about halfway there. The biggest problem we ran into was that every great idea a physician brought to me was instantly dead in the water because practically no insurance company would pay for it.

There are (prior to COVID-19) a plethora of rules around virtual care billing but the simplest diflucan prostatitis way to summarize it is that most virtual care will only be paid if it happens in a rural location and inside of a health care facility. It is extremely limited what will be paid for in the patient home and most of it is so specific that the average patient isn’t eligible to get any in-home virtual care. Therefore, most good medical uses for direct-to-consumer care would be asking the patient to pay cash or the physician to forgo reimbursement for a visit that would be covered if it happened in office. Add to that the massive capital and diflucan prostatitis operating expenses it takes to build a virtual care network and you can see why these programs don’t exist.

A month ago I was skeptical we’d have a robust direct-to-consumer program any time soon and then COVID-19 hit. When COVID-19 started to spread rapidly in the United States, regulations and reimbursement rules were being stripped daily. The first change that had major impact is when the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) announced that diflucan prostatitis they would temporarily begin reimbursing for virtual visits conducted in the patient’s home for COVID-19 and non-COVID related visits. We were already frantically designing a virtual program to handle the wave of COVID-19 screening visits that were overloading our emergency departments and urgent cares.

We were having plenty of discussions around reimbursement for this clinic. Do we attempt to diflucan prostatitis bill insurances knowing they will likely deny, do we do a cash clinic model or do we do this as a community benefit and eat the cost?. The CMS waiver gave us hope that we would be compensated for diverting patients away from reimbursed visits to a virtual visit that is more convenient for the patient and aligns with the concept of social distancing. Realistically we don’t know if we will be paid for any of this.

We are holding all of the bills for at least 90 days while the industry sorts out the diflucan prostatitis rules. I was excited by the reimbursement announcement because I knew we had eliminated one of the biggest direct-to-consumer virtual care barriers. However, I was quickly brought back to reality when I was reminded that HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act) still existed. I had this crazy idea that during a pandemic we should make it as easy as possible for people to receive virtual care and that the best way to do that was to meet the patient on the device they are most comfortable diflucan prostatitis with and the application (FaceTime, Facebook, Skype, etc.) that they use every day.

The problem is nearly every app the consumer uses on a daily basis is banned by HIPAA because “it’s not secure.” I’m not quite sure what a hacker stands to gain by listening into to my doctor and me talk about how my kids yet again gave me strep throat but apparently the concern is great enough to stifle the entire industry. Sure, not every health care discussion is as low-key as strep throat and a patient may want to protect certain topics from being discussed over a “non-secure” app but why not let the patient decide through informed consent?. Regulators could also abandon this all-or-nothing approach diflucan prostatitis and lighten regulations surrounding specific health conditions. The idea that regulations change based on medical situation is not new.

For example, in my home state of Michigan, adolescents are essentially considered emancipated if it involves sexual health, mental health or substance abuse. Never mind that this same information is freely given over diflucan prostatitis the phone by every office around the country daily without issue, but I digress. While my job is to innovate new pathways for care, our lawyer’s job is to protect the organization and he, along with IT security, rightfully shot down my consumer applications idea. A few days later I legitimately screamed out loud in joy when the Department of Health and Human Services announced that it would use discretion on enforcing HIPAA compliance rules and specifically allowed for use of consumer applications.

The elimination of billing restrictions and HIPAA regulations changed what diflucan prostatitis is possible for health care organizations to offer virtually. Unfortunately both changes are listed as temporary and will likely be removed when the pandemic ends. Six days after the HIPAA changes were announced, we launched a centralized virtual clinic for any patient that wanted a direct-to-consumer video visit to be screened by a provider for COVID-19. It allows patients to call in without a referral and most patients diflucan prostatitis are on-screen within five minutes of clicking the link we text them.

They don’t have to download an app, create an account or even be an established patient of our health system. It saw over 900 patients in the first 12 days it was open. That is 900 real patients that received care from a physician or advanced practice provider without risking personal exposure and without going to an already overwhelmed ED or urgent diflucan prostatitis care. To date, 70 percent of the patients seen by the virtual clinic did not meet CDC testing criteria for COVID-19.

I don’t believe we could have reached even half of these patients had the consumer application restrictions been kept. A program like this almost certainly wouldn’t exist if diflucan prostatitis not for the regulations being lifted and even if it did, it would have taken six to 12 months to navigate barriers and implement in normal times. Sure, the urgency of a pandemic helps but the impact of provider, patients, regulators and payors being on the same page is what fueled this fire. During the virtual clinic’s first two weeks, my team turned its attention to getting over 300 providers across 60+ offices virtual so they could see their patients at home.

Imagine being an immunocompromised cancer patient right now diflucan prostatitis and being asked to leave your home and be exposed to other people in order to see your oncologist. Direct-to-consumer virtual care is the best way to safely care for these patients and without these temporary waivers it wouldn’t be covered by insurance even if you did navigate the clunky apps that are HIPAA compliant. Do we really think the immunocompromised cancer patient feels any more comfortable every normal flu season?. Is it any more appropriate to ask them to risk exposure to the flu diflucan prostatitis than it is to COVID-19?.

And yet we deny them this access in normal times and it quite possibly will be stripped away from them when this crisis is over. Now 300 to 400 patients per day in our health system are seen virtually by their own primary care doctor or specialist for non-COVID related visits. Not diflucan prostatitis a single one of these would have been reimbursed one month ago and I am highly skeptical I would have gotten approval to use the software that connects us to the patient. Lastly, recall that prior to COVID-19, our system had only found 250 total patients that direct-to-consumer care was value-added and wasn’t restricted by regulation or reimbursement.

COVID-19 has been a wake-up call to the whole country and health care is no exception. It has put priorities in perspective and diflucan prostatitis shined a light on what is truly value-added. For direct-to-consumer virtual care it has shown us what is possible when we get out of our own way. If a regulation has to be removed to allow for care during a crisis then we must question why it exists in the first place.

HIPAA regulation cannot go back to its antiquated practices if we are truly going to diflucan prostatitis shift the focus to patient wellness. CMS and private payors must embrace value-added direct-to-consumer virtual care and allow patients the access they deserve. COVID-19 has forced this industry forward, we cannot allow it to regress and be forgotten when this is over. Tom Wood is the director of trauma and virtual care for MidMichigan Health, a non-profit health system headquartered in Midland, Michigan, affiliated with Michigan Medicine, the health care division diflucan prostatitis of the University of Michigan.

The views and opinions expressed in this commentary are his own.When dealing with all of the aspects of diabetes, it’s easy to let your feel fall to the bottom of the list. But daily care and evaluation is one of the best ways to prevent foot complications. It’s important to identify your risk factors and take the proper steps in limiting your diflucan prostatitis complications. Two of the biggest complications with diabetes are peripheral neuropathy and ulcer/amputation.

Symptoms of peripheral neuropathy include numbness, tingling and/or burning in your feet and legs. You can diflucan prostatitis slow the progression of developing neuropathy by making it a point to manage your blood sugars and keep them in the normal range. If you are experiencing these symptoms, it is important to establish and maintain a relationship with a podiatrist. Your podiatrist can make sure things are looking healthy and bring things to your attention to monitor and keep a close eye on.

Open wounds or ulcers can diflucan prostatitis develop secondary to trauma, pressure, diabetes, neuropathy or poor circulation. If ulcerations do develop, it’s extremely important to identify the cause and address it. Ulcers can get worse quickly, so it’s necessary to seek immediate medical treatment if you find yourself or a loved one dealing with this complication. Untreated ulcerations often lead to amputation diflucan prostatitis and can be avoided if proper medical attention is sought right away.

There are important things to remember when dealing with diabetic foot care. It’s very important to inspect your feet daily, especially if you have peripheral neuropathy. You may have a cut or diflucan prostatitis a sore on your feet that you can’t feel, so your body doesn’t alarm you to check your feet. Be gentle when bathing your feet.

Moisturize your feet, but not between your toes. Do not treat calluses or corns on your own.

For the where to buy diflucan pills past few weeks I’ve seen Facebook posts daily from former nursing colleagues in metro Detroit, one of the look at here now hardest hit areas in the country, as they provide front-line care to patients with COVID-19. It makes me very proud to call these nurses my friends. As a former emergency department nurse, I recall the feeling of satisfaction knowing that I’ve helped someone on the worst day of their life. One of the best parts of being a nurse is knowing you matter to the only person in health care that where to buy diflucan pills truly matters.

The patient. Several years ago I made the difficult decision to no longer perform bedside nursing and become a nurse administrator. The biggest loss from my transition is the feeling that what I do where to buy diflucan pills matters to the patient. COVID-19 has forced a lot of us to rethink the role we play in health care and what the real priority should be.

Things that were top priorities three months ago have been rightfully cast aside to either care for patients in a pandemic or prepare for the unknown future of, “When is our turn?. € For where to buy diflucan pills me, COVID-19 has reignited the feeling that what I do matters as virtual care has become a powerful tool on the forefront of care during this crisis. It has also shown that many of the powerful rules and regulations that limit virtual care are not needed and should be discarded permanently. When I became the director of virtual care at our organization in 2015 I knew nothing about telehealth.

Sure, I where to buy diflucan pills had seen a stroke robot in some Emergency Departments, and I had some friends that told me their insurance company lets them FaceTime a doctor for free (spoiler alert. It’s not FaceTime). I was tech-savvy from a consumer perspective and a tech novice from an IT perspective. Nevertheless, my team and I spent the next few years learning as we built one of the higher volume virtual care networks in the where to buy diflucan pills state of Michigan.

We discovered a lot of barriers that keep virtual care from actually making the lives of patients and providers better and we also became experts in working around those barriers. But, there were two obstacles that we could not overcome. Government regulation and insurance provider willingness to where to buy diflucan pills cover virtual visits. These two barriers effectively cripple most legitimate attempts to provide value-added direct-to-consumer virtual care, which I define as using virtual care technologies to provide care outside of our brick-and-mortar facilities, most commonly in the patient home.

The need to social distance, cancel appointments, close provider offices, keep from overloading emergency departments and urgent cares and shelter in place created instant demand for direct-to-consumer virtual care. In all honesty, I’ve always considered direct-to-consumer virtual care to be the where to buy diflucan pills flashy, must-have holiday gift of the year that organizations are convinced will be the way of the future. If a health system wants to provide on-demand access to patients for low-complexity acute conditions, they will easily find plenty of vendors that will sell them their app and their doctors and put the health system’s logo on it. What a health system will struggle with is to find is enough patient demand to cover the high cost.

Remember my friends from earlier that told me where to buy diflucan pills about the app their insurance gave them?. Nearly all of them followed that up by telling me they’ve never actually used it. I am fortunate that I work for an organization that understands this and instead focuses on how can we provide care that our patients actually want and need from the doctors they want to see. Ironically, this fiscal year we had a corporate top priority where to buy diflucan pills around direct-to-consumer virtual care.

We wanted to expand what we thought were some successful pilots and perform 500 direct-to-consumer visits. This year has been one of the hardest of my leadership career because, frankly, up until a month ago I was about to fail on this top priority. With only four months left, we were only about halfway there where to buy diflucan pills. The biggest problem we ran into was that every great idea a physician brought to me was instantly dead in the water because practically no insurance company would pay for it.

There are (prior to COVID-19) a plethora of rules around virtual care billing but the simplest way to summarize it is that most virtual care will only be paid if it happens in a rural location and inside of a health care facility. It is extremely where to buy diflucan pills limited what will be paid for in the patient home and most of it is so specific that the average patient isn’t eligible to get any in-home virtual care. Therefore, most good medical uses for direct-to-consumer care would be asking the patient to pay cash or the physician to forgo reimbursement for a visit that would be covered if it happened in office. Add to that the massive capital and operating expenses it takes to build a virtual care network and you can see why these programs don’t exist.

A month ago I was skeptical we’d where to buy diflucan pills have a robust direct-to-consumer program any time soon and then COVID-19 hit. When COVID-19 started to spread rapidly in the United States, regulations and reimbursement rules were being stripped daily. The first change that had major impact is when the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) announced that they would temporarily begin reimbursing for virtual visits conducted in the patient’s home for COVID-19 and non-COVID related visits. We were already frantically designing a virtual program to handle the wave of COVID-19 screening visits that were overloading where to buy diflucan pills our emergency departments and urgent cares.

We were having plenty of discussions around reimbursement for this clinic. Do we attempt to bill insurances knowing they will likely deny, do we do a cash clinic model or do we do this as a community benefit and eat the cost?. The CMS waiver gave us hope that we would be compensated for diverting patients away from reimbursed where to buy diflucan pills visits to a virtual visit that is more convenient for the patient and aligns with the concept of social distancing. Realistically we don’t know if we will be paid for any of this.

We are holding all of the bills for at least 90 days while the industry sorts out the rules. I was excited by the reimbursement where to buy diflucan pills announcement because I knew we had eliminated one of the biggest direct-to-consumer virtual care barriers. However, I was quickly brought back to reality when I was reminded that HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act) still existed. I had this crazy idea that during a pandemic we should make it as easy as possible for people to receive virtual care and that the best way to do that was to meet the patient on the device they are most comfortable with and the application (FaceTime, Facebook, Skype, etc.) that they use every day.

The problem is nearly every app the consumer uses on a daily basis is banned by HIPAA because “it’s not secure.” I’m not quite sure what a hacker stands where to buy diflucan pills to gain by listening into to my doctor and me talk about how my kids yet again gave me strep throat but apparently the concern is great enough to stifle the entire industry. Sure, not every health care discussion is as low-key as strep throat and a patient may want to protect certain topics from being discussed over a “non-secure” app but why not let the patient decide through informed consent?. Regulators could also abandon this all-or-nothing approach and lighten regulations surrounding specific health conditions. The idea where to buy diflucan pills that regulations change based on medical situation is not new.

For example, in my home state of Michigan, adolescents are essentially considered emancipated if it involves sexual health, mental health or substance abuse. Never mind that this same information http://www.scc-geyer.de/diflucan-150mg-tablet-price/ is freely given over the phone by every office around the country daily without issue, but I digress. While my job is to innovate new pathways for care, our lawyer’s where to buy diflucan pills job is to protect the organization and he, along with IT security, rightfully shot down my consumer applications idea. A few days later I legitimately screamed out loud in joy when the Department of Health and Human Services announced that it would use discretion on enforcing HIPAA compliance rules and specifically allowed for use of consumer applications.

The elimination of billing restrictions and HIPAA regulations changed what is possible for health care organizations to offer virtually. Unfortunately both changes are listed as temporary where to buy diflucan pills and will likely be removed when the pandemic ends. Six days after the HIPAA changes were announced, we launched a centralized virtual clinic for any patient that wanted a direct-to-consumer video visit to be screened by a provider for COVID-19. It allows patients to call in without a referral and most patients are on-screen within five minutes of clicking the link we text them.

They don’t have to download where to buy diflucan pills an app, create an account or even be an established patient of our health system. It saw over 900 patients in the first 12 days it was open. That is 900 real patients that received care from a physician or advanced practice provider without risking personal exposure and without going to an already overwhelmed ED or urgent care. To date, 70 percent of the patients where to buy diflucan pills seen by the virtual clinic did not meet CDC testing criteria for COVID-19.

I don’t believe we could have reached even half of these patients had the consumer application restrictions been kept. A program like this almost certainly wouldn’t exist if not for the regulations being lifted and even if it did, it would have taken six to 12 months to navigate barriers and implement in normal times. Sure, the urgency of a pandemic helps but the impact of provider, where to buy diflucan pills patients, regulators and payors being on the same page is what fueled this fire. During the virtual clinic’s first two weeks, my team turned its attention to getting over 300 providers across 60+ offices virtual so they could see their patients at home.

Imagine being an immunocompromised cancer patient right now and being asked to leave your home and be exposed to other people in order to see your oncologist. Direct-to-consumer virtual care is the best way to safely care for these patients and without these temporary waivers it wouldn’t be covered by insurance even if you did navigate the clunky apps that are HIPAA compliant where to buy diflucan pills. Do we really think the immunocompromised cancer patient feels any more comfortable every normal flu season?. Is it any more appropriate to ask them to risk exposure to the flu than it is to COVID-19?.

And yet we deny them this where to buy diflucan pills access in normal times and it quite possibly will be stripped away from them when this crisis is over. Now 300 to 400 patients per day in our health system are seen virtually by their own primary care doctor or specialist for non-COVID related visits. Not a single one of these would have been reimbursed one month ago and I am highly skeptical I would have gotten approval to use the software that connects us to the patient. Lastly, recall where to buy diflucan pills that prior to COVID-19, our system had only found 250 total patients that direct-to-consumer care was value-added and wasn’t restricted by regulation or reimbursement.

COVID-19 has been a wake-up call to the whole country and health care is no exception. It has put priorities in perspective and shined a light on what is truly value-added. For direct-to-consumer virtual care it has shown where to buy diflucan pills us what is possible when we get out of our own way. If a regulation has to be removed to allow for care during a crisis then we must question why it exists in the first place.

HIPAA regulation cannot go back to its antiquated practices if we are truly going to shift the focus to patient wellness. CMS and private payors must embrace value-added direct-to-consumer virtual care and allow patients the access where to buy diflucan pills they deserve. COVID-19 has forced this industry forward, we cannot allow it to regress and be forgotten when this is over. Tom Wood is the director of trauma and virtual care for MidMichigan Health, a non-profit health system headquartered in Midland, Michigan, affiliated with Michigan Medicine, the health care division of the University of Michigan.

The views and opinions expressed in this commentary are his own.When dealing with all where to buy diflucan pills of the aspects of diabetes, it’s easy to let your feel fall to the bottom of the list. But daily care and evaluation is one of the best ways to prevent foot complications. It’s important to identify your risk factors and take the proper steps in limiting your complications. Two of the biggest complications with diabetes are peripheral neuropathy and where to buy diflucan pills ulcer/amputation.

Symptoms of peripheral neuropathy include numbness, tingling and/or burning in your feet and legs. You can slow the progression of developing neuropathy by making it a point to manage your blood sugars and keep them in the normal range. If you are experiencing these symptoms, it is important to establish and maintain a relationship where to buy diflucan pills with a podiatrist. Your podiatrist can make sure things are looking healthy and bring things to your attention to monitor and keep a close eye on.

Open wounds or ulcers can develop secondary to trauma, pressure, diabetes, neuropathy or poor circulation. If ulcerations do develop, it’s extremely important to where to buy diflucan pills identify the cause and address it. Ulcers can get worse quickly, so it’s necessary to seek immediate medical treatment if you find yourself or a loved one dealing with this complication. Untreated ulcerations often lead to amputation and can be avoided if proper medical attention is sought right away.

There are important things to remember when where to buy diflucan pills dealing with diabetic foot care. It’s very important to inspect your feet daily, especially if you have peripheral neuropathy. You may have a cut or a sore on your feet that you can’t feel, so your body doesn’t alarm you to check your feet. Be gentle when where to buy diflucan pills bathing your feet.

Moisturize your feet, but not between your toes. Do not treat calluses or corns on your own. Wear clean, where to buy diflucan pills dry socks. Never walk barefoot, and consider socks and shoes made specifically for patients with diabetes.

Kristin Raleigh, D.P.M., is a podiatrist who sees patients at Foot &. Ankle Specialists of Mid-Michigan in Midland.

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As the novel coronavirus spread across the United States this spring, the http://scc-geyer.de/diflucan/ demand for telehealth skyrocketed in turn – as how effective is diflucan for candida did concerns about patient access to virtual care. A new study from the Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association published this week showed that in New York City during the first few months of the pandemic, how effective is diflucan for candida Black and Latino patients had lower odds of using telehealth versus other modalities. This remains true, said researchers from the Department of Population Health Sciences and Policy, even after adjusting for age, comorbidities and preferred language. HIMSS20 Digital Learn on-demand, earn credit, find how effective is diflucan for candida products and solutions.

Get Started how effective is diflucan for candida >>. "While telehealth has many benefits, especially during a global pandemic, it may create and/or exacerbate health disparities," wrote the research team.WHY IT MATTERSThe COVID-19 pandemic has disproportionately affected people of color in the United States, with researchers flagging the serious ramifications that could arise from using potentially biased artificial intelligence models to address the coronavirus. At the same time, patients have turned to telehealth as a way to avoid in-person transmission and address medical needs."Essentially overnight, as part of efforts to reduce the transmission of COVID-19, two of the major previous barriers to telehealth use – poor financial reimbursement and low provider willingness – were eliminated, thus massively speeding up adoption," wrote the researchers.The sporadic use of telehealth how effective is diflucan for candida before the pandemic made it difficult to determine how often it was used by different demographic groups – although, the researchers noted, "older Americans, rural communities, vulnerable populations, racial and ethnic minorities, and those with lower socioeconomic status are all groups disadvantaged by the digital divide" in general.Using the Mount Sinai De-Identified COVID-19 database, researchers examined information from all patients diagnosed with, placed under investigation for, or screened negative for COVID-19 with any Mount Sinai system provider between March 20 and May 18. During the peak pandemic period in New York City, the researchers found that patients older than 65 had the lowest odds of using telehealth for COVID-related care versus going to the emergency room or an office visit.Black and Latino patients had higher how effective is diflucan for candida adjusted odds of using either the ER or office visits versus telehealth than either white or Asian patients.The researchers note that a number of factors may have contributed to the findings, such as patients not having access to a usual source of care (such as a primary care physician) or being sicker."However, the fact that we still find significant racial/ethnic disparities between outpatient office visits and telehealth indicate there may be other issues at play," noted the researchers."Disparities in digital access, digital literacy, and telehealth awareness, as well as issues of cost and coverage, and mistrust of digital appointments where physical examinations, labs and vitals cannot be taken are all potential barriers to telehealth," they continued.THE LARGER TRENDEven as telehealth use has bloomed around the country, many are still being left behind.

Many stakeholders have noted the importance of expanding access to broadband as a fundamental necessity – an endeavor that may run up, as Federal Office of Rural Health Senior Adviser for Telehealth William England put it, a "hundreds-of-billion-dollar" price tag.In areas with broadband availability, telehealth is still not always an option. As Sen how effective is diflucan for candida. Tina Smith, D-Minnesota, pointed out in an interview with Healthcare IT News in June, people in cities may also lack access to the internet – or face other hurdles to accessing how effective is diflucan for candida telehealth."COVID is not the great equalizer," Smith said. "It hits harder those who are already struggling, who lack access to healthcare ...

Because of the generational impacts of systemic racism on Black, brown and indigenous people."ON THE RECORD"Our findings of racial differences in how effective is diflucan for candida telehealth use should be interpreted within the context of persistent structural racism in the U.S.,” wrote the researchers. "We include how effective is diflucan for candida race as a predictor in our model because documenting racial/ethnic differences for public awareness is a necessary first step in reducing disparities, however we view race as a social construct. The formal and informal policies and interactions rooted in inequality, discrimination, oppression and exclusion, which underlie this construct and engender factors we hypothesize are contributing to our results, should also be addressed in future research," they continued. Kat Jercich is senior editor of Healthcare IT how effective is diflucan for candida News.Twitter.

@kjercichHealthcare IT News is a HIMSS Media publication.Transitional care management is a set of services – conducted after a patient transitions to the community how effective is diflucan for candida following discharge from the acute or post-acute setting – aiming to improve patient transitions back into the community, reduce avoidable emergency department visits and hospital readmissions, and minimize gaps in care.THE PROBLEMTransitional care-management components include interactive contact and certain face-to-face and non-face-to-face services. Interactive contact is one transitional-care-management component in which the discharging provider must contact the patient or caregiver via phone, via email or in person within 48 hours post-discharge in order to set up a face-to-face follow-up visit and bill for transitional-care-management services. HIMSS20 Digital Learn on-demand, earn how effective is diflucan for candida credit, find products and solutions. Get Started >> how effective is diflucan for candida.

Patients discharged from acute care hospitals, inpatient rehab hospitals, long-term acute care hospitals, and skilled levels of care qualify for an interactive contact within 48 hours post-discharge. If contact with the patient is not made within this required time frame, the provider cannot bill for transitional-care-management services – and the first provider to make contact is the only one that can bill for the services.Allegheny Health Network, a Highmark Health Company, sought to optimize its transitional care management services to reduce avoidable emergency department visits and hospital how effective is diflucan for candida readmissions, and to close gaps in care. Specifically, its transitional-care-management program goals included increasing transitional-care-management encounters post-discharge, increasing seven-day follow-up visits post-discharge, improved medication reconciliation post-discharge and an optimized transitional-care-management revenue stream."The platform provides us with how effective is diflucan for candida the contextual information we need, in real time, to better monitor patient transitions across the continuum of care."Dr. Bill Johnjulio, Allegheny Health Network Primary Care InstituteAllegheny Health Network handles more than 80,000 discharges and observations per year, but lacked comprehensive, interoperable data to efficiently identify all transitions of care – particularly discharges from non-Allegheny Health Network acute and post-acute providers.

Allegheny Health Network faced challenges in identifying and contacting patients how effective is diflucan for candida that qualify for transitional-care-management services, including post-discharge interactive contact (phone calls) and subsequent face-to-face visits.PROPOSALAs part of Allegheny Health Network/Physician Partners of Western Pennsylvania’s Practice Transformation initiative, the Allegheny Health Network team, led by Dr. Bill Johnjulio, medical director of Physician Partners of Western Pennsylvania and chairman of the Allegheny Health Network Primary Care Institute, sought to increase transitional-care-management encounters post-discharge from an acute inpatient hospitalization or from a post-acute facility within 24 to 48 hours.“To improve the timeliness with which practices are notified of a transition of care, in order to commence the transitional care management process – and to ultimately improve outcomes, reduce inefficiencies and optimize revenue – Allegheny Health Network needed a how effective is diflucan for candida solution to better identify patient transitions of care in real time,” Johnjulio explained. €œAllegheny Health Network turned to CarePort Health’s care coordination software solution, CarePort Connect, which provides real-time visibility into patient transitions across the continuum of care.”CarePort’s platform bridges acute and post-acute EHRs, allowing all providers – including hospitals and health systems, payers and ACOs – to better track and manage patients across the continuum and provide coordinated care, he added. The platform provides a more comprehensive and automated mechanism to identify transitions of care, he said.MEETING THE CHALLENGEThe platform flags patients at the time of discharge from acute and post-acute care who fall within Allegheny Health Network’s Clinically Integrated Network and notifies providers in real time of these discharges how effective is diflucan for candida.

Using the platform, Allegheny Health Network can quickly identify patients who require transitional-care-management services within 48 hours of discharge and schedule follow-up office visits seven to 14 days post-discharge, Johnjulio said.The platform’s real-time, actionable how effective is diflucan for candida information enables a more holistic view of patient transitions of care, so helping avoid unnecessary utilization of health services, improve overall patient care coordination and reduce the likelihood that patients will return to the hospital, he added. Additionally, the software fits into current workflows, making it easy to use and adopt across different locations, he said.“The platform takes away all of the manual detective work in transitional-care-management,” Johnjulio said. €œThe platform provides us with the how effective is diflucan for candida contextual information we need, in real time, to better monitor patient transitions across the continuum of care.”To date, the CarePort platform has been implemented at 119 primary care offices within the Clinically Integrated Network (Physician Partners of Western Pennsylvania), 65% of the network’s offices, with future plans to roll out CarePort across the entire Allegheny Health Network provider base. CarePort Connect is used by more than 600 active users, including nurses, nurse navigators, pharmacists and physicians, how effective is diflucan for candida to help manage patient transitions.RESULTS“After implementing CarePort Connect to augment the practice transformation initiative, the Allegheny Health Network Primary Care Institute and Physician Partners of Western Pennsylvania generated improved value-based program performance through increased care coordination,” Johnjulio explained.Additionally, Allegheny Health Network has achieved the following results:49% year-over-year increase in transitional care management encounters.44% year-over-year transitional care management revenue increase.10% increase in medication reconciliation compliance post-discharge in one at-risk entity within the Clinically Integrated Network.ADVICE FOR OTHERS“With the adoption of technology solutions that foster increased communication and transparency, we will realize a more effective integration across the continuum – PCPs, hospitals, post-acute care and rehabilitation facilities, and at-home care – breaking down silos among what have historically been disparate care settings,” Johnjulio said.

€œThough healthcare providers may be hesitant to adopt new tools or solutions because of implementation or onboarding challenges, or for fear that they will disrupt current workflows, there are solutions that fit within existing current workflows and minimize administrative burden.”Technologies that help break down healthcare silos and provide a holistic view of the patient journey can ultimately improve outcomes and efficiency, and save time and money for the organization, he added.“From our own experience in implementing a care coordination solution to increase transitional-care-management encounters, Allegheny Health Network has improved both the volume and quality of these encounters, better ensuring patients are receiving the appropriate care at the appropriate time and maintaining communication with disparate providers across the continuum – including primary care physicians – so that they are aware of the patient’s status and can take the appropriate necessary next steps in that patient’s care,” Johnjulio said.When siloed systems become interoperable – and cross-continuum providers achieve improved transparency and communication – patient outcomes improve, he concluded. All providers how effective is diflucan for candida should strive after improved interoperability across the care continuum to better serve their patients, he said.Twitter. @SiwickiHealthITEmail the how effective is diflucan for candida writer. Bill.siwicki@himss.orgHealthcare IT News is a HIMSS Media publication..

As the novel coronavirus spread across the United States this spring, the demand for telehealth skyrocketed in turn – where to buy diflucan pills as did concerns about http://www.scc-geyer.de/diflucan-150mg-tablet-price/ patient access to virtual care. A new study from the Journal of where to buy diflucan pills the American Medical Informatics Association published this week showed that in New York City during the first few months of the pandemic, Black and Latino patients had lower odds of using telehealth versus other modalities. This remains true, said researchers from the Department of Population Health Sciences and Policy, even after adjusting for age, comorbidities and preferred language.

HIMSS20 Digital Learn on-demand, earn credit, find where to buy diflucan pills products and solutions. Get Started >> where to buy diflucan pills. "While telehealth has many benefits, especially during a global pandemic, it may create and/or exacerbate health disparities," wrote the research team.WHY IT MATTERSThe COVID-19 pandemic has disproportionately affected people of color in the United States, with researchers flagging the serious ramifications that could arise from using potentially biased artificial intelligence models to address the coronavirus.

At the same time, patients have turned to telehealth as a way to avoid in-person transmission and address medical needs."Essentially overnight, as part where to buy diflucan pills of efforts to reduce the transmission of COVID-19, two of the major previous barriers to telehealth use – poor financial reimbursement and low provider willingness – were eliminated, thus massively speeding up adoption," wrote the researchers.The sporadic use of telehealth before the pandemic made it difficult to determine how often it was used by different demographic groups – although, the researchers noted, "older Americans, rural communities, vulnerable populations, racial and ethnic minorities, and those with lower socioeconomic status are all groups disadvantaged by the digital divide" in general.Using the Mount Sinai De-Identified COVID-19 database, researchers examined information from all patients diagnosed with, placed under investigation for, or screened negative for COVID-19 with any Mount Sinai system provider between March 20 and May 18. During the peak pandemic period in New York City, the researchers found that patients older than 65 had the lowest odds of using telehealth for COVID-related care versus going to the emergency room or an office visit.Black and Latino patients had higher adjusted odds of using either the ER or office visits versus telehealth than either white or Asian patients.The researchers note that a number of factors may have contributed to the findings, such as patients not having access to a usual source of care (such as a primary care physician) or being sicker."However, the fact that we still find significant racial/ethnic disparities between outpatient office visits and telehealth indicate there may be other issues at play," noted the researchers."Disparities in digital access, digital literacy, and telehealth awareness, as well as issues of cost and coverage, and mistrust of digital where to buy diflucan pills appointments where physical examinations, labs and vitals cannot be taken are all potential barriers to telehealth," they continued.THE LARGER TRENDEven as telehealth use has bloomed around the country, many are still being left behind. Many stakeholders have noted the importance of expanding access to broadband as a fundamental necessity – an endeavor that may run up, as Federal Office of Rural Health Senior Adviser for Telehealth William England put it, a "hundreds-of-billion-dollar" price tag.In areas with broadband availability, telehealth is still not always an option.

As Sen where to buy diflucan pills. Tina Smith, D-Minnesota, pointed out in an interview with Healthcare IT News in June, people in cities may also lack access to the internet – or face other where to buy diflucan pills hurdles to accessing telehealth."COVID is not the great equalizer," Smith said. "It hits harder those who are already struggling, who lack access to healthcare ...

Because of the generational impacts of systemic racism on Black, brown and indigenous people."ON THE RECORD"Our findings of racial differences in telehealth use should be interpreted within the context of persistent structural racism in the U.S.,” wrote the researchers where to buy diflucan pills. "We include race as a predictor in our model because documenting racial/ethnic differences for public awareness where to buy diflucan pills is a necessary first step in reducing disparities, however we view race as a social construct. The formal and informal policies and interactions rooted in inequality, discrimination, oppression and exclusion, which underlie this construct and engender factors we hypothesize are contributing to our results, should also be addressed in future research," they continued.

Kat Jercich is senior editor of Healthcare where to buy diflucan pills IT News.Twitter. @kjercichHealthcare IT News is a HIMSS Media publication.Transitional care management is a set of services – conducted after a patient transitions to the community following discharge from the acute or post-acute setting where to buy diflucan pills – aiming to improve patient transitions back into the community, reduce avoidable emergency department visits and hospital readmissions, and minimize gaps in care.THE PROBLEMTransitional care-management components include interactive contact and certain face-to-face and non-face-to-face services. Interactive contact is one transitional-care-management component in which the discharging provider must contact the patient or caregiver via phone, via email or in person within 48 hours post-discharge in order to set up a face-to-face follow-up visit and bill for transitional-care-management services.

HIMSS20 Digital Learn on-demand, where to buy diflucan pills earn credit, find products and solutions. Get Started >> where to buy diflucan pills. Patients discharged from acute care hospitals, inpatient rehab hospitals, long-term acute care hospitals, and skilled levels of care qualify for an interactive contact within 48 hours post-discharge.

If contact with the patient is not made within this required time frame, the provider cannot bill for transitional-care-management services – and the first provider to make contact is where to buy diflucan pills the only one that can bill for the services.Allegheny Health Network, a Highmark Health Company, sought to optimize its transitional care management services to reduce avoidable emergency department visits and hospital readmissions, and to close gaps in care. Specifically, its transitional-care-management program goals included increasing transitional-care-management encounters post-discharge, increasing seven-day follow-up visits post-discharge, improved medication reconciliation post-discharge and an optimized transitional-care-management where to buy diflucan pills revenue stream."The platform provides us with the contextual information we need, in real time, to better monitor patient transitions across the continuum of care."Dr. Bill Johnjulio, Allegheny Health Network Primary Care InstituteAllegheny Health Network handles more than 80,000 discharges and observations per year, but lacked comprehensive, interoperable data to efficiently identify all transitions of care – particularly discharges from non-Allegheny Health Network acute and post-acute providers.

Allegheny Health Network faced challenges in identifying and contacting where to buy diflucan pills patients that qualify for transitional-care-management services, including post-discharge interactive contact (phone calls) and subsequent face-to-face visits.PROPOSALAs part of Allegheny Health Network/Physician Partners of Western Pennsylvania’s Practice Transformation initiative, the Allegheny Health Network team, led by Dr. Bill Johnjulio, medical director of Physician Partners of Western Pennsylvania and chairman of the Allegheny Health Network Primary Care Institute, sought to increase transitional-care-management encounters where to buy diflucan pills post-discharge from an acute inpatient hospitalization or from a post-acute facility within 24 to 48 hours.“To improve the timeliness with which practices are notified of a transition of care, in order to commence the transitional care management process – and to ultimately improve outcomes, reduce inefficiencies and optimize revenue – Allegheny Health Network needed a solution to better identify patient transitions of care in real time,” Johnjulio explained. €œAllegheny Health Network turned to CarePort Health’s care coordination software solution, CarePort Connect, which provides real-time visibility into patient transitions across the continuum of care.”CarePort’s platform bridges acute and post-acute EHRs, allowing all providers – including hospitals and health systems, payers and ACOs – to better track and manage patients across the continuum and provide coordinated care, he added.

The platform provides a more comprehensive and automated mechanism to identify transitions of care, where to buy diflucan pills he said.MEETING THE CHALLENGEThe platform flags patients at the time of discharge from acute and post-acute care who fall within Allegheny Health Network’s Clinically Integrated Network and notifies providers in real time of these discharges. Using the platform, Allegheny Health Network can quickly identify patients who require transitional-care-management services where to buy diflucan pills within 48 hours of discharge and schedule follow-up office visits seven to 14 days post-discharge, Johnjulio said.The platform’s real-time, actionable information enables a more holistic view of patient transitions of care, so helping avoid unnecessary utilization of health services, improve overall patient care coordination and reduce the likelihood that patients will return to the hospital, he added. Additionally, the software fits into current workflows, making it easy to use and adopt across different locations, he said.“The platform takes away all of the manual detective work in transitional-care-management,” Johnjulio said.

€œThe platform provides us with the contextual information we need, in real time, to better monitor patient transitions across the continuum of care.”To where to buy diflucan pills date, the CarePort platform has been implemented at 119 primary care offices within the Clinically Integrated Network (Physician Partners of Western Pennsylvania), 65% of the network’s offices, with future plans to roll out CarePort across the entire Allegheny Health Network provider base. CarePort Connect is used by more than 600 active users, including nurses, nurse navigators, pharmacists and physicians, to help manage patient transitions.RESULTS“After implementing CarePort Connect to augment the practice transformation initiative, the Allegheny Health Network Primary Care Institute and Physician Partners of Western Pennsylvania generated improved value-based program performance through increased care coordination,” Johnjulio explained.Additionally, Allegheny Health Network has achieved the following results:49% year-over-year increase in transitional care management encounters.44% year-over-year transitional care management revenue increase.10% increase in medication reconciliation compliance post-discharge in one at-risk entity within the Clinically Integrated Network.ADVICE FOR OTHERS“With the adoption of technology solutions that foster increased communication and transparency, we will realize a more effective integration across the continuum – PCPs, hospitals, post-acute where to buy diflucan pills care and rehabilitation facilities, and at-home care – breaking down silos among what have historically been disparate care settings,” Johnjulio said. €œThough healthcare providers may be hesitant to adopt new tools or solutions because of implementation or onboarding challenges, or for fear that they will disrupt current workflows, there are solutions that fit within existing current workflows and minimize administrative burden.”Technologies that help break down healthcare silos and provide a holistic view of the patient journey can ultimately improve outcomes and efficiency, and save time and money for the organization, he added.“From our own experience in implementing a care coordination solution to increase transitional-care-management encounters, Allegheny Health Network has improved both the volume and quality of these encounters, better ensuring patients are receiving the appropriate care at the appropriate time and maintaining communication with disparate providers across the continuum – including primary care physicians – so that they are aware of the patient’s status and can take the appropriate necessary next steps in that patient’s care,” Johnjulio said.When siloed systems become interoperable – and cross-continuum providers achieve improved transparency and communication – patient outcomes improve, he concluded.

All providers should strive after improved interoperability across the care continuum to better serve their patients, where to buy diflucan pills he said.Twitter. @SiwickiHealthITEmail the where to buy diflucan pills writer. Bill.siwicki@himss.orgHealthcare IT News is a HIMSS Media publication..

How many mg of diflucan to treat yeast infection

About This TrackerThis tracker provides the number of confirmed cases and deaths from novel coronavirus by country, the trend how many mg of diflucan to treat yeast infection in confirmed http://www.scc-geyer.de/diflucan-150mg-tablet-price/ case and death counts by country, and a global map showing which countries have confirmed cases and deaths. The data are drawn from the Johns Hopkins University (JHU) Coronavirus Resource Center’s COVID-19 Map and the World Health Organization’s (WHO) Coronavirus Disease (COVID-2019) situation reports.This tracker will be updated regularly, as new data are released.Related Content. About COVID-19 CoronavirusIn late 2019, a new coronavirus emerged in central China to cause disease in humans how many mg of diflucan to treat yeast infection.

Cases of this disease, known as COVID-19, have since been reported across around the globe. On January 30, 2020, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared how many mg of diflucan to treat yeast infection the virus represents a public health emergency of international concern, and on January 31, 2020, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services declared it to be a health emergency for the United States.As of October 16, Congress has enacted four emergency supplemental funding bills to address the COVID-19 pandemic, which collectively provide almost $3.2 billion for the global response.

Of this amount, approximately $2.4 billion (75%) was designated for country, regional, and worldwide programming efforts through the State Department ($350 how many mg of diflucan to treat yeast infection million), the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) ($1.24 billion), and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) ($800 million). The remainder how many mg of diflucan to treat yeast infection was for operating expenses, including the evacuation of U.S.

Citizens and consular operations. With negotiations between how many mg of diflucan to treat yeast infection Congress and the Administration over a fifth supplemental package on shaky ground, we examined the status of global COVID-19 country, regional, and worldwide funding to assess how much has been committed to date and where it has been directed.Data were available to analyze virtually all (97%) of the $1.59 billion provided to State and USAID, specifically the funding that had been committed as of August 21, 2020.1 The data also included $99 million in existing funding provided by USAID through its Emergency Reserve Fund for Contagious Infectious Disease Outbreaks (ERF),2 bringing the total to approximately $1.64 billion. Data were not available on funding provided to CDC, including data disaggregated by country or region.3The analysis shows that:As of August 21, 2020, more than $1.6 billion has been committed by State and USAID to respond to COVID-19 globally, including virtually all (approximately $1.54 billion) of the funding provided through COVID-19 emergency supplemental appropriations and $99 million of existing funding from the ERF.Funding was first committed on February 7, through the ERF and before the passage of emergency supplemental funding bills.

Funding commitments were next announced on March 27, soon after the first how many mg of diflucan to treat yeast infection emergency supplemental bill was enacted, and announcements of commitments continued through August 21. See Figure 1.Most funding has been directed to Africa (30%), followed by Asia (17%), the Middle East and North Africa (13%), Latin America and the Caribbean (9%), and Europe and Eurasia (7%). An additional 25% is categorized as “worldwide” funding, which is not designated for a specific region or country at this time.

See Figure 2.Funding has been committed to 117 countries (additional countries may be how many mg of diflucan to treat yeast infection reached through regional and worldwide programming) to support a range of activities, including (but not limited to). Case management, community engagement, disease surveillance, infection prevention and control in health facilities, laboratory systems capacity and preparedness, and risk communications. See Table 1.The how many mg of diflucan to treat yeast infection ten countries with the largest funding commitments, by region, include:Africa (4 countries.

Ethiopia [which receives the greatest amount of funding], Nigeria, South Sudan, and Sudan);Asia (2 countries. Afghanistan and Bangladesh);the Middle East and North how many mg of diflucan to treat yeast infection Africa (3 countries. Iraq, Jordan, and Lebanon).

AndEurope and how many mg of diflucan to treat yeast infection Eurasia (1 country. Italy, the only high income country in the top 10, receives the second greatest amount of funding – $50 million).See Figure 3. These ten countries each received at least $35 million and how many mg of diflucan to treat yeast infection together account for more than a quarter of funding ($444.3 million) committed by State and USAID.

Figure 1. U.S. Committed Global COVID-19 Funding.

About This TrackerThis tracker provides the number of confirmed cases and deaths from where to buy diflucan pills novel coronavirus by country, the trend in confirmed case and death counts by country, http://scc-geyer.de/how-to-get-diflucan-without-a-doctor/ and a global map showing which countries have confirmed cases and deaths. The data are drawn from the Johns Hopkins University (JHU) Coronavirus Resource Center’s COVID-19 Map and the World Health Organization’s (WHO) Coronavirus Disease (COVID-2019) situation reports.This tracker will be updated regularly, as new data are released.Related Content. About COVID-19 CoronavirusIn late 2019, a new coronavirus emerged in central China to cause disease in where to buy diflucan pills humans.

Cases of this disease, known as COVID-19, have since been reported across around the globe. On January 30, 2020, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared the virus represents a public health emergency of international concern, and on where to buy diflucan pills January 31, 2020, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services declared it to be a health emergency for the United States.As of October 16, Congress has enacted four emergency supplemental funding bills to address the COVID-19 pandemic, which collectively provide almost $3.2 billion for the global response.

Of this where to buy diflucan pills amount, approximately $2.4 billion (75%) was designated for country, regional, and worldwide programming efforts through the State Department ($350 million), the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) ($1.24 billion), and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) ($800 million). The remainder where to buy diflucan pills was for operating expenses, including the evacuation of U.S.

Citizens and consular operations. With negotiations between Congress and the Administration over a fifth supplemental package on shaky ground, we examined the status of global COVID-19 country, regional, and worldwide funding to assess how much has been where to buy diflucan pills committed to date and where it has been directed.Data were available to analyze virtually all (97%) of the $1.59 billion provided to State and USAID, specifically the funding that had been committed as of August 21, 2020.1 The data also included $99 million in existing funding provided by USAID through its Emergency Reserve Fund for Contagious Infectious Disease Outbreaks (ERF),2 bringing the total to approximately $1.64 billion. Data were not available on funding provided to CDC, including data disaggregated by country or region.3The analysis shows that:As of August 21, 2020, more than $1.6 billion has been committed by State and USAID to respond to COVID-19 globally, including virtually all (approximately $1.54 billion) of the funding provided through COVID-19 emergency supplemental appropriations and $99 million of existing funding from the ERF.Funding was first committed on February 7, through the ERF and before the passage of emergency supplemental funding bills.

Funding commitments were next announced on March 27, soon after the first emergency supplemental bill was where to buy diflucan pills enacted, and announcements of commitments continued through August 21. See Figure 1.Most funding has been directed to Africa (30%), followed by Asia (17%), the Middle East and North Africa (13%), Latin America and the Caribbean (9%), and Europe and Eurasia (7%). An additional 25% is categorized as “worldwide” funding, which is not designated for a specific region or country at this time.

See Figure 2.Funding has been committed to 117 countries (additional countries may be reached through regional and worldwide programming) to support a where to buy diflucan pills range of activities, including (but not limited to). Case management, community engagement, disease surveillance, infection prevention and control in health facilities, laboratory systems capacity and preparedness, and risk communications. See Table 1.The ten countries with the largest where to buy diflucan pills funding commitments, by region, include:Africa (4 countries.

Ethiopia [which receives the greatest amount of funding], Nigeria, South Sudan, and Sudan);Asia (2 countries. Afghanistan and Bangladesh);the Middle where to buy diflucan pills East and North Africa (3 countries. Iraq, Jordan, and Lebanon).

AndEurope and Eurasia where to buy diflucan pills (1 country. Italy, the only high income country in the top 10, receives the second greatest amount of funding – $50 million).See Figure 3. These ten countries each received at where to buy diflucan pills least $35 million and together account for more than a quarter of funding ($444.3 million) committed by State and USAID.

Figure 1. U.S. Committed Global COVID-19 Funding.

Can you drink alcohol with diflucan

GREAT FALLS, Mont can you drink alcohol with diflucan. €” For months, the jail in central Montana’s Cascade County was free of the coronavirus, which seemed as distant a threat as it did in much of the nation’s rural Mountain West.Then a few people who had the virus were arrested. By the time Paul Krogue, the jail’s medical director, realized there was a problem, nearly 50 inmates were infected in the jail, can you drink alcohol with diflucan where some had been sleeping on mats on an overcrowded floor.

After several weeks, Mr. Krogue got a call that infections were spreading to a side of the jail can you drink alcohol with diflucan that had been virus-free.He hung up the phone and put his head in his hands.“I just kind of lost it, like, ‘My God, I don’t know how much longer I can do this,’” Mr. Krogue, a nurse practitioner, recalled.

€œI was just scared that I’m not going to be able to see it through, that I’m going to get sick — you just feel so exhausted and it’s just a lot.”The Mountain West, which for months avoided the worst of the pandemic, has rapidly devolved into one of the most alarming hot spots in a country that recorded its eight millionth confirmed case on Thursday, a day when more than 65,000 cases were announced nationwide, the most in a single day since July.Seventeen states, including many in the Mountain West, have added more cases in the past week than any other week of the pandemic. And the spread through sparsely populated areas of rural America has created problems in small towns that lack critical resources — including can you drink alcohol with diflucan doctors — even in ordinary times.Wyoming, which did not have 1,000 total cases until June, recently added more than 1,000 in a single week. Reports of new infections have recently reached record levels in Alaska, Colorado and Idaho.

And Montana, where more than half of the state’s cases have been announced since August, is averaging more than 500 cases can you drink alcohol with diflucan per day.In Cascade County, more than 300 inmates and staff members have been infected in a facility meant to hold 365 people, the county’s first major outbreak in a region where the virus is suddenly surging.The county seat, Great Falls, is seeing its worst case numbers yet. The local hospital and its 27-bed Covid-19 unit is at capacity. The county health department is racing to hire new contact tracers.

And Mr can you drink alcohol with diflucan. Krogue, who also teaches nursing at Montana State University’s Great Falls campus, has seen attendance in his classes dwindle as students fall ill or quarantine.“I was just scared that I’m not going to be able to see it through, that I’m going to get sick,” said Paul Krogue, the jail’s medical director.Credit...Tailyr Irvine for The New York TimesOne place where the infections have spread has been local jails, which are confined, often crowded spaces. Jails are can you drink alcohol with diflucan staples of local communities and tend to have people coming and going more quickly than prisons.

Jails can hold everyone from people awaiting criminal trials for months to those picked up for a suspended driver’s license for a few hours. With so many people filtering in and out, jails pose extra risks for the virus’s spread — can you drink alcohol with diflucan not only inside facilities but in potentially feeding outbreaks in the rest of the community.Nationally, jails and prisons have seen disproportionate rates of infection and death, with a mortality rate twice as high as in the general population and an infection rate more than four times as high, according to recent data.A New York Times database has tracked clusters of at least 50 coronavirus cases in a dozen rural jails in Montana, Idaho, Utah and New Mexico during the pandemic. Among them.

The Purgatory Correctional Center in Hurricane, Utah, with 166 infections. The jail in can you drink alcohol with diflucan Twin Falls, Idaho, with 279. And, in New Mexico, the Cibola County Correctional Center, which has reported 357 cases.In Cascade County, infections at the jail make up about a quarter of all known virus cases in the county.

Health authorities say that the jail’s outbreak, can you drink alcohol with diflucan which began in mid-August, was not believed to be the main cause of the community’s recent surge, but that it had led to some cases. In the past two months, Mr. Krogue said, the jail released 29 people who were considered actively infected.Infections at the jail make up about a quarter of Cascade County’s known virus cases.Credit...Tailyr Irvine for The New York TimesGreat Falls, home to about 58,000 residents, is in the less mountainous part of Montana, with the Missouri River flowing through and a large oil refinery on its banks.

The Cascade County Detention Center sits along a highway at the edge of can you drink alcohol with diflucan town. Drive five miles in any direction and you are surrounded by wide-open plains.Montana requires that masks be worn inside businesses and indoor public spaces, and many people in Great Falls wear them when walking around downtown’s Central Avenue, where shops and cafes are still recovering from shutting down in the spring. Others go without masks, citing the open space and lack of crowds.Bob Kelly, the mayor, said people had not been overly worried about how the jail outbreak might affect the rest of town when it started.“I think that by the very definition of a jail, hopefully, the disease will be incarcerated, as well can you drink alcohol with diflucan as the patients,” he said.

€œIs there concern?. Sure, can you drink alcohol with diflucan there’s concern. But is there overreaction?.

No.”The mayor of Great Falls said that residents had considered the jail’s outbreak a distant concern at first.Credit...Tailyr Irvine for The New York TimesSome residents’ nonchalance about the risks of the virus, said Mr. Krogue, the jail’s medical director, can be traced to a spring and early summer when almost no one in Cascade County knew anyone who had been sickened.“We benefited from that early on,” he said can you drink alcohol with diflucan. €œBut in some ways, I think it did us a disservice, too, because it also created a certain level of complacency.”That has quickly shifted now, he said, as cases have spiked.The number of active cases known to county officials on any given day has risen sharply to about 600, according to Trisha Gardner, Cascade County’s health officer.

The county has seen 1,261 cases and six deaths during the pandemic, a Times database can you drink alcohol with diflucan shows. Some of the cases have been tied to the jail outbreak, she said, and others have been connected to bars and restaurants. Even figuring out what has led to some cases has been complex, she said, as residents have been reluctant to cooperate with contact tracers.“Our hospitals are at capacity, our public health system is at capacity,” she said.

€œIt’s not sustainable at this can you drink alcohol with diflucan rate.”When the outbreak at the jail began, social distancing was impossible, the authorities said. Three inmates shared cells designed for two. At night, men slept on thin blue pads in can you drink alcohol with diflucan every available space.

On the floor in the day room, in shower stalls, in stairwells, in hallways outside of cells.Inmates did not receive masks until August, and jail officials said many have refused to wear them.In interviews with more than a dozen inmates and their family members, inmates described the jail during the outbreak as chaotic and unsanitary. They said their pleas for help often went unanswered by nurses and guards.Newly arriving inmates were not always quarantined from one another before their test results were known because of a lack of space, inmates and jail officials said.Owen Hawley, 30, said every inmate in his living area of 38 men had tested positive for the virus. He said he had been unable to eat for three days, had intensive body aches and suffered from a headache so powerful it felt as if it was “behind my eyes.”“After the fourth day of like, not eating and stuff, I just shut off, you know? can you drink alcohol with diflucan.

€ he said.A jail area set aside for quarantining new inmates.Credit...Tailyr Irvine for The New York TimesAt one point, Mr. Hawley said, he and other prisoners protested the way the virus was being handled by refusing to leave their living areas and by blocking new inmates from entering can you drink alcohol with diflucan. Everyone was ultimately tested, Mr.

Hawley said, and each prisoner was given a disposable mask.Sierra Jasmine Wells, 25, another inmate, said women in her dormitory had grown ill, one can you drink alcohol with diflucan after the next.“Everyone around me was getting sick and it was tough on me,” she said. €œBy then, I had already accepted the fact that I was going to get sick.”When she became infected, she said, she was given cough syrup and Tylenol.“I kind of was just left alone to deal with it,” she said.Jesse Slaughter, the county sheriff who oversees the jail, said that the jail’s medical staff was doing everything it could, and that he had been seeking health care assistance from other counties. Officials defended their handling of the outbreak, noting that all inmates received standard medications including Tylenol twice a day and were taken to area hospitals when they needed added care.

Seven inmates, as well as some staff members, were can you drink alcohol with diflucan hospitalized. No one from the jail has died from the virus, officials said.Sheriff Jesse Slaughter, who oversees the jail, said he had been seeking health care assistance from other counties.Credit...Tailyr Irvine for The New York TimesMr. Krogue said that since the start of the outbreak he had been can you drink alcohol with diflucan working up to 16 hours each day and sleeping in his basement, away from his wife and children.

He remains healthy but says he fears bringing the virus home. The virus has slowed some in the jail, and officials have moved some inmates to other facilities, but other prisons and jails in the state are now seeing outbreaks.“You can start to see what some of these other places experienced much earlier on, and we just didn’t have that experience, but it’s certainly happening now,” Mr. Krogue said can you drink alcohol with diflucan.

€œIt’s just real in a way that it wasn’t.”Lucy Tompkins reported from Great Falls, Maura Turcotte from Chicago and Libby Seline from Lincoln, Neb. Reporting was contributed by Izzy Colón from Columbia, Mo., Brendon Derr from Phoenix, Rebecca Griesbach from Tuscaloosa, Ala., can you drink alcohol with diflucan Danya Issawi and Timothy Williams from New York, Ann Hinga Klein from Des Moines, K.B. Mensah from Silver Spring, Md., and Mitch Smith from Chicago.Start Preamble Federal Transit Administration (FTA), DOT.

Notice of can you drink alcohol with diflucan funding opportunity. The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) public health emergency Start Printed Page 63654has had a significant impact on transit operations. During a series of FTA listening sessions held over the last three months, transit agencies asked FTA to support research to identify solutions to address the operational challenges that they are facing as a result of COVID-19.

In response, FTA makes available through this Notice of Funding Opportunity (NOFO) funding to support research demonstration grants to public transit agencies to develop, deploy, and demonstrate innovative solutions that improve the operational can you drink alcohol with diflucan efficiency of transit agencies, as well as enhance the mobility of transit users affected by the COVID-19 public health emergency. Demonstration grants under this NOFO are authorized under FTA's Public Transportation Innovation Program (49 U.S.C. 5312).

Eligible projects will demonstrate innovative solutions to improve the operational efficiencies of transit systems and enhance mobility for their communities in four major areas. (1) Vehicle, facility, equipment and infrastructure cleaning and disinfection. (2) exposure mitigation measures.

(3) innovative mobility such as contactless payments. And (4) measures that strengthen public confidence in transit services. The total funding available for awards under this NOFO is $10,000,000.

FTA may supplement this amount if additional funding becomes available. Applicants must submit completed proposals for funding opportunity FTA-2020-015-TRI through the GRANTS.GOV “APPLY” function by 11:59 p.m. Eastern Time on November 2, 2020.

Prospective applicants should register as soon as possible on the GRANTS.GOV website to ensure they can complete the application process before the submission deadline. Application instructions are available on FTA's website at http://transit.dot.gov/​howtoapply and in the “FIND” module of GRANTS.GOV. FTA will not accept mail and fax submissions.

Start Further Info Please send any questions on this notice to Jamel El-Hamri email. Jamel.El-Hamri@dot.gov phone. 2020-366-8985.

A Telecommunication Device for the Deaf (TDD) is available for individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing at 1-800-877-8339. End Further Info End Preamble Start Supplemental Information Table of Contents A. Program Description B.

Federal Award Information C. Eligibility Information D. Application and Submission Information E.

Application Review Information F. Federal Award Administration Information G. Federal Awarding Agency Contact Information A.

Program Description The Public Transportation COVID-19 Research Demonstration Grant Program is funded through the Public Transportation Innovation Program (49 U.S.C. 5312), with the goal to develop, deploy, and demonstrate innovative solutions that improve the operational efficiency of transit agencies, as well as enhance the mobility of transit users affected by the COVID-19 public health emergency. Eligible projects will propose to develop and deploy innovative solutions in four major areas.

(1) Vehicle, facility, equipment and infrastructure cleaning and disinfection. (2) exposure mitigation measures. (3) innovative mobility such as contactless payments.

And (4) measures that strengthen public confidence in transit. As required by 49 U.S.C. 5312(e)(4), projects funded under this NOFO must participate in an evaluation by an independent outside entity that will conduct a comprehensive evaluation of the success or failure of the projects funded under this subsection and any plan for broad-based implementation of the innovation promoted by successful projects.

B. Federal Award Information FTA makes available $10,000,000 in fiscal year (FY) 2020 funds under the Public Transportation Innovation Program (49 U.S.C. 5312) to finance the Public Transportation COVID-19 Research Demonstration Grant Program.

FTA may supplement the total funds available if additional funding becomes available at the time project selections are made. FTA will grant pre-award authority starting on the date of the project award announcement for selected projects and should be completed within 24 months from the date of award. Funds are available only for eligible expenses incurred after the announcement of project selections.

C. Eligibility Information (1) Eligible Applicants Eligible applicants include State and local governmental authorities, direct recipients of Urbanized Area (49 U.S.C. 5307) and Rural Area (49 U.S.C.

5311) formula funds, and Indian tribes. Eligible applicants are limited to FTA grantees or subrecipients who would be the primary beneficiaries of the innovative products and services that are developed—typically public transit agencies. Except for projects proposed by Indian tribes, proposals for projects in rural (non-urbanized) areas must be submitted as part of a consolidated State proposal.

States and other eligible applicants also may submit consolidated proposals for projects in urbanized areas. The submission of the Statewide application will not preclude the submission and consideration of any application from other eligible recipients in an urbanized area in a State. Proposals may contain projects to be implemented by the recipient or its subrecipients.

Eligible subrecipients include public agencies, private nonprofit organizations, and private providers engaged in public transportation. Eligible applicants may submit consolidated proposals for projects. (2) Cost Sharing or Matching The maximum Federal share of project costs is 100 percent.

FTA may give additional consideration to applicants that propose a local share and may view these applicants as more competitive. The applicant must document the source(s) of the local match, if any, in the grant application. For any applicants proposing match, eligible local match sources include the following.

Cash from non-Government sources other than revenues from providing public transportation services. Revenues derived from the sale of advertising and concessions. Revenues generated from value capture financing mechanisms.

Funds from an undistributed cash surplus. Replacement or depreciation cash fund or reserve. New capital.

Or in-kind contributions. (3) Eligible Projects Eligible projects will propose innovative solutions to improve operational efficiencies of transit agencies and enhance the mobility of transit users, through projects that demonstrate innovative solutions for. Vehicle, facility, equipment and infrastructure cleaning and disinfection.

Exposure mitigation measures such a real-time notification of rail and bus passenger loads. New multi-modal payment innovative mobility systems such as contactless payments. And measures that strengthen public confidence in transit.

Each applicant may only submit one proposal.Start Printed Page 63655 D. Application and Submission Information (1) Address and Form of Application Submission Applications must be submitted through GRANTS.GOV. Applicants can find general information for submitting applications through GRANTS.GOV at www.fta.dot.gov/​howtoapply, along with specific instructions for the forms and attachments required for submission.

Mail and fax submissions will not be accepted. (2) Content and Form of Application Submission a. Proposal Submission A complete proposal submission consists of at least two forms.

1. The SF-424 Mandatory Form (downloadable from GRANTS.GOV) and 2. The supplemental form for the FY 2020 COVID-19 Demonstration Program (downloadable from GRANTS.GOV), which is available on FTA's website at (placeholder for FTA COVID-19 Demonstration Program).

The application must include responses to all sections of the SF-424 mandatory form and the supplemental form unless a section is indicated as optional. FTA will use the information on the supplemental form to determine applicant and project eligibility for the program and to evaluate the proposal against the selection criteria described in part E of this notice. FTA will accept only one supplemental form per SF-424 submission.

FTA encourages applicants to consider submitting a single supplemental form that includes multiple activities to be evaluated as a consolidated proposal. Applicants may attach additional supporting information to the SF-424 submission, including but not limited to letters of support, project budgets, or excerpts from relevant planning documents. Supporting documentation must be described and referenced by file name in the appropriate response section of the supplemental form, or it may not be reviewed.

Information such as applicant name, Federal amount requested, local match amount, description of areas served, etc., may be requested in varying degrees of detail on both the SF-424 form and supplemental form. Applicants must fill in all fields unless stated otherwise on the forms. If applicants copy information into the supplemental form from another source, they should verify that the supplemental form has fully captured pasted text and that it has not truncated the text due to character limits built into the form.

Applicants should use both the “Check Package for Errors” and the “Validate Form” validation buttons on both forms to check all required fields. Applicants should also ensure that the Federal and local amounts specified are consistent. Addressing the deteriorating conditions and disproportionately high fatality rates on our rural transportation infrastructure is of critical interest to the Department, as rural transportation networks face unique challenges in safety, infrastructure condition, and passenger and freight usage.

Consistent with the R.O.U.T.E.S. Initiative, the Department encourages applicants to consider how the project will address the challenges faced by rural areas. B.

Application Content The SF-424 Mandatory Form and the supplemental form will prompt applicants for the required information, including. I. Applicant Name ii.

Dun and Bradstreet (D&B) Data Universal Numbering System (DUNS) number iii. Key contact information (contact name, address, email address, and phone number) iv. Congressional district(s) where project will take place v.

Project Information (title, executive summary, and type) vi. A detailed description of the need for the project vii. A detailed description of how the project will support the Program objectives viii.

Evidence that the applicant can provide the local cost shares ix. A description of the technical, legal, and financial capacity of the applicant x. A detailed project budget xi.

Details on the local matching funds xii. A detailed project timeline xiii. Whether the project impacts an Opportunity Zone (3) Unique Entity Identifier and System for Award Management (SAM) Each applicant is required to.

(1) Be registered in SAM before submitting an application. (2) provide a valid unique entity identifier in its application. And (3) continue to maintain an active SAM registration with current information at all times during which the applicant has an active Federal award or an application or plan under consideration by FTA.

These requirements do not apply if the applicant. (1) Is excepted from the requirements under 2 CFR 25.110(b) or (c). Or (2) has an exception approved by FTA under 2 CFR 25.110(d).

FTA may not make an award until the applicant has complied with all applicable unique entity identifier and SAM requirements. If an applicant has not fully complied with the requirements by the time FTA is ready to make an award, FTA may determine that the applicant is not qualified to receive an award and use that determination as a basis for making a Federal award to another applicant. All applicants must provide a unique entity identifier provided by SAM.

Registration in SAM may take as little as 3-5 business days, but there can be unexpected steps or delays. For example, the applicant may need to obtain an Employer Identification Number. FTA recommends allowing ample time, up to several weeks, to complete all steps.

For additional information on obtaining a unique entity identifier, please visit www.sam.gov. (4) Submission Dates and Times Project proposals must be submitted electronically through GRANTS.GOV by 11:59 p.m. Eastern on November 2, 2020.

Mail and fax submissions will not be accepted. FTA urges applicants to submit applications at least 72 hours prior to the due date to allow time to correct any problems that may have caused either GRANTS.GOV or FTA systems to reject the submission. Proposals submitted after the deadline will only be considered under extraordinary circumstances not within the applicant's control.

Deadlines will not be extended due to scheduled website maintenance. GRANTS.GOV scheduled maintenance and outage times are announced on the GRANTS.GOV website. Within 48 hours after submitting an electronic application, the applicant should receive two email messages from GRANTS.GOV.

(1) Confirmation of successful transmission to GRANTS.GOV. And (2) confirmation of successful validation by GRANTS.GOV. If the applicant does not receive confirmation of successful validation or receives a notice of failed validation or incomplete materials, the applicant must address the reason for the failed validation, as described in the email notice, and resubmit before the submission deadline.

If making a resubmission for any reason, applicants must include all original attachments regardless of which attachments were updated and check the box on the supplemental form indicating this is a resubmission. Applicants are encouraged to begin the process of registration on the GRANTS.GOV site well in advance of the submission deadline. Registration is Start Printed Page 63656a multi-step process, which may take several weeks to complete before an application can be submitted.

Registered applicants may still be required to update their registration before submitting an application. Registration in SAM is renewed annually and persons making submissions on behalf of the Authorized Organization Representative (AOR) must be authorized in GRANTS.GOV by the AOR to make submissions. (5) Funding Restrictions Funds may be used for post-award expenditures only.

Funds under this NOFO cannot be used to reimburse projects for otherwise eligible expenses incurred prior to the date of project award announcements. (6) Other Submission Requirements FTA encourages applicants to identify scaled funding options in case insufficient funding is available to fund a project at the full requested amount. If an applicant indicates that a project is scalable, the applicant must provide an appropriate minimum funding amount that will fund an eligible project that achieves the objectives of the program and meets all relevant program requirements.

The applicant must provide a clear explanation of how a reduced award would affect the project budget and scope. FTA may award a lesser amount whether or not the applicant provides a scalable option. E.

Application Review Information (1) Project Evaluation Criteria Addressing the deteriorating conditions and disproportionately high fatality rates on our rural transportation infrastructure is of critical interest to the Department, as rural transportation networks face unique challenges in safety, infrastructure condition, and passenger and freight usage. Consistent with the R.O.U.T.E.S. Initiative, the Department will consider how the project will address the challenges faced by rural areas.

In addition, the Department will review and consider applications for funding pursuant to this Notice in accordance with the President's September 2, 2020 memorandum, entitled Memorandum on Reviewing Funding to State and Local Government Recipients of Federal Funds that Are Permitting Anarchy, Violence, and Destruction in American Cities, consistent with guidance from the Office of Management and Budget and the Attorney General and with all applicable laws. FTA will evaluate proposals submitted according to the following criteria. (a) Project Innovation and Impact.

(b) Project Approach. (c) National Applicability. (d) Commercialization and/or Knowledge Transfer.

And (e) Technical, Legal and Financial Capacity. FTA encourages each applicant to demonstrate how a project supports all criteria with the most relevant information the applicant can provide, regardless of whether such information has been specifically requested or identified in this notice. A.

Project Innovation and Impact i. Effectiveness of the project in achieving and demonstrating the specific objectives of this program. Ii.

Demonstration of benefits in addressing the needs of the transit agency and industry and impacts to infrastructure, equipment, transit workforce, and riders. Iii. Degree of improvement over current and existing technologies, designs, and/or practices applicable to the transit industry.

B. Project Approach i. Quality of the project approach such as existing partnerships, collaboration strategies and level of commitment of the project partners.

Ii. Proposal is realistic in its approach to fulfill the milestones/deliverables, schedule and goals. C.

National Applicability i. Degree to which the project could be replicated by other transit agencies regionally or nationally. Ii.

Ability to evaluate technologies, designs and/or practices in a wide variety of conditions and locales. Iii. Degree to which the technology, designs and/or practices can be replicated by other transportation modes.

D. Commercialization and/or Knowledge Transfer i. Demonstrates a realistic plan for moving the results of the project into the transit marketplace (patents, conferences, articles in trade magazines, webinar, site visits, etc.).

Ii. How the project team plans to work with the industry on improving best practices, guidance and/or standards, if applicable. Iii.

Demonstrate a clear understanding and robust approach to data collection, access and management. E. Technical, Legal and Financial Capacity Capacity of the applicant and any partners to successfully execute the project effort.

There should be no outstanding legal, technical, or financial issues with the applicant that would make this a high-risk project. (2) Review and Selection Process An FTA technical evaluation committee will evaluate proposals based on the published project evaluation criteria. Members of the technical evaluation committee will rate the applications and may seek clarification about any statement in an application.

The FTA Administrator will determine the final selection and amount of funding for each project after consideration of the findings of the technical evaluation committee. Geographic diversity, diversity of the project type, the amount of local match to be provided, and the applicant's receipt and management of other Federal transit funds may be considered in FTA's award decisions. Prior fare payment innovation efforts may receive priority consideration.

The FTA Administrator will consider the following key DOT objectives. A. Utilizing alternative funding sources and innovative financing models to attract non-Federal sources of investment.

B. Whether the project is located in or supports public transportation service in a qualified opportunity zone designated pursuant to 26.U.S.C. 1400Z-1.

And c. The extent to which the project addresses challenges specific to the provision of rural public transportation. (3) FAPIIS Review Prior to making a grant award, FTA is required to review and consider any information about the applicant that is in the Federal Awardee Performance and Integrity Information System (FAPIIS) accessible through SAM.

An applicant may review and comment on information about itself that a Federal awarding agency previously entered. FTA will consider any comments by the applicant, in addition to the other information in FAPIIS, in making a judgment about the applicant's integrity, business ethics, and record of performance under Federal awards when completing the review of risk posed by applicants as described in 2 CFR 200.205 Federal Awarding Agency Review of Risk Posed by Applicants. F.

Federal Award Administration Information (1) Federal Award Notices FTA will announce the final project selections on the FTA website. Project recipients should contact their FTA Regional Office for additional information regarding allocations for Start Printed Page 63657projects. At the time project selections are announced, FTA will extend pre-award authority for the selected projects.

There is no blanket pre-award authority for these projects before announcement. There is no minimum or maximum grant award amount, but FTA intends to fund as many meritorious projects as possible. FTA only will consider proposals from eligible recipients for eligible activities.

Due to funding limitations, projects selected for funding may receive less than the amount originally requested. In those cases, applicants must be able to demonstrate that the proposed projects are still viable and can be completed with the amount awarded. (2) Administrative and National Policy Requirements a.

Pre-Award Authority FTA will issue specific guidance to recipients regarding pre-award authority at the time of selection. FTA does not provide pre-award authority for competitive funds until projects are selected, and there are Federal requirements that must be met before costs are incurred. For more information about FTA's policy on pre-award authority, see the FY 2020 Apportionments Notice published on June 3, 2020, at https://www.govinfo.gov/​content/​pkg/​FR-2020-06-03/​pdf/​2020-11946.pdf.

b. Grant Requirements Selected applicants will submit a grant application through FTA's electronic grant management system and adhere to the customary FTA grant requirements for research project (insert Circular name). All competitive grants, regardless of award amount, will be subject to the Congressional notification and release process.

FTA emphasizes that third-party procurement applies to all funding awards, as described in FTA Circular 4220.1F, “Third Party Contracting Guidance.” However, FTA may approve applications that include a specifically identified partnering organization(s) (2 CFR 200.302(f)). When included, the application, budget, and budget narrative should provide a clear understanding of how the selection of these organizations is critical for the project and give sufficient detail about the costs involved. C.

Planning FTA encourages applicants to engage the appropriate State Departments of Transportation, Regional Transportation Planning Organizations, or Metropolitan Planning Organizations in areas to be served by the project funds available under this program. D. Standard Assurances The applicant assures that it will comply with all applicable Federal statutes, regulations, executive orders, FTA circulars, and other Federal administrative requirements in carrying out any project supported by the FTA grant.

The applicant acknowledges that it is under a continuing obligation to comply with the terms and conditions of the grant agreement issued for its project with FTA. The applicant understands that Federal laws, regulations, policies, and administrative practices might be modified from time to time and may affect the implementation of the project. The applicant agrees that the most recent Federal requirements will apply to the project unless FTA issues a written determination otherwise.

The applicant must submit the Certifications and Assurances before receiving a grant if it does not have current certifications on file. E. Free Speech and Religious Liberty In connection with any program or activity conducted with or benefiting from funds awarded under this notice, recipients of funds must comply with all applicable requirements of Federal law, including, without limitation, the Constitution of the United States.

Statutory, regulatory, and public policy requirements, including without limitation, those protecting free speech, religious liberty, public welfare, the environment, and prohibiting discrimination. The conditions of performance, non-discrimination requirements, and other assurances made applicable to the award of funds in accordance with regulations of the Department of Transportation. And applicable Federal financial assistance and contracting principles promulgated by the Office of Management and Budget.

In complying with these requirements, recipients must ensure that no concession agreements are denied or other contracting decisions made on the basis of speech or other activities protected by the First Amendment. If the Department determines that a recipient has failed to comply with applicable Federal requirements, the Department may terminate the award of funds and disallow previously incurred costs, requiring the recipient to reimburse any expended award funds. (3) Reporting The post-award reporting requirements include submission of the Federal Financial Report (FFR) and Milestone Progress Report in TrAMS.

An evaluation of the grant will occur at various points in the demonstration process and at the end of the project. In addition, FTA is responsible for producing an Annual Report to Congress that compiles evaluation of selected projects, including an evaluation of the performance measures identified by the applicants. All applicants must develop an evaluation plan to measure the success or failure of their projects and describe any plans for broad-based implementation of successful projects.

FTA may request data and reports to support the evaluation and Annual Report. A. Independent Evaluation To achieve a comprehensive understanding of the impacts and implications of each proposed COVID-19 Research Demonstration Program, projects funded under this announcement will require the recipient to conduct a third party independent evaluation of their project.

Recipients will be required to contract with a third party independent evaluator to assist in developing an evaluation plan, and collecting, storing and managing data required to fulfill the evaluation requirement. No more than 10 percent of the Federal share of the project may be used to hire the third-party independent evaluator and the inclusion of a third-party independent evaluation should be described in the grant application. If the project duration is more than two years, an interim evaluation report would need to be submitted to FTA, otherwise the evaluation report should be included as part of the final project report.

B. COVID-19 Research Demonstration Grant Program Evaluation Projects funded under this announcement will be required to establish a set of performance metrics set by the third-party independent evaluator and shared with FTA. G.

Federal Awarding Agency Contacts Information For questions about applying, please contact Jamel El-Hamri email. Jamel.El-Hamri@dot.gov phone. 202-366-8985.

A TDD is available at 1-800-877-8339 (TDDFIRS). To ensure that applicants receive accurate information about eligibility or the program, applicants are encouraged to contact FTA directly with questions, rather than through intermediaries or third parties.Start Printed Page 63658 FTA staff also may conduct briefings on the competitive grants selection and award process upon request. Start Signature K.

Jane Williams, Deputy Administrator. End Signature End Supplemental Information [FR Doc. 2020-22316 Filed 10-7-20.

GREAT FALLS, Mont where to buy diflucan pills. €” For months, the jail in central Montana’s Cascade County was free of the coronavirus, which seemed as distant a threat as it did in much of the nation’s rural Mountain West.Then a few people who had the virus were arrested. By the where to buy diflucan pills time Paul Krogue, the jail’s medical director, realized there was a problem, nearly 50 inmates were infected in the jail, where some had been sleeping on mats on an overcrowded floor. After several weeks, Mr. Krogue got a call that infections were spreading to a side of the where to buy diflucan pills jail that had been virus-free.He hung up the phone and put his head in his hands.“I just kind of lost it, like, ‘My God, I don’t know how much longer I can do this,’” Mr.

Krogue, a nurse practitioner, recalled. €œI was just scared that I’m not going to be able to see it through, that I’m going to get sick — you just feel so exhausted and it’s just a lot.”The Mountain West, which for months avoided the worst of the pandemic, has rapidly devolved into one of the most alarming hot spots in a country that recorded its eight millionth confirmed case on Thursday, a day when more than 65,000 cases were announced nationwide, the most in a single day since July.Seventeen states, including many in the Mountain West, have added more cases in the past week than any other week of the pandemic. And the spread through sparsely populated areas of rural America has created problems in small towns that lack critical where to buy diflucan pills resources — including doctors — even in ordinary times.Wyoming, which did not have 1,000 total cases until June, recently added more than 1,000 in a single week. Reports of new infections have recently reached record levels in Alaska, Colorado and Idaho. And Montana, where where to buy diflucan pills more than half of the state’s cases have been announced since August, is averaging more than 500 cases per day.In Cascade County, more than 300 inmates and staff members have been infected in a facility meant to hold 365 people, the county’s first major outbreak in a region where the virus is suddenly surging.The county seat, Great Falls, is seeing its worst case numbers yet.

The local hospital and its 27-bed Covid-19 unit is at capacity. The county health department is racing to hire new contact tracers. And Mr where to buy diflucan pills. Krogue, who also teaches nursing at Montana State University’s Great Falls campus, has seen attendance in his classes dwindle as students fall ill or quarantine.“I was just scared that I’m not going to be able to see it through, that I’m going to get sick,” said Paul Krogue, the jail’s medical director.Credit...Tailyr Irvine for The New York TimesOne place where the infections have spread has been local jails, which are confined, often crowded spaces. Jails are staples of local communities and tend to have people coming and going more quickly than where to buy diflucan pills prisons.

Jails can hold everyone from people awaiting criminal trials for months to those picked up for a suspended driver’s license for a few hours. With so many people filtering in and out, jails pose extra risks for the virus’s spread — not only inside facilities but in potentially feeding outbreaks where to buy diflucan pills in the rest of the community.Nationally, jails and prisons have seen disproportionate rates of infection and death, with a mortality rate twice as high as in the general population and an infection rate more than four times as high, according to recent data.A New York Times database has tracked clusters of at least 50 coronavirus cases in a dozen rural jails in Montana, Idaho, Utah and New Mexico during the pandemic. Among them. The Purgatory Correctional Center in Hurricane, Utah, with 166 infections. The jail where to buy diflucan pills in Twin Falls, Idaho, with 279.

And, in New Mexico, the Cibola County Correctional Center, which has reported 357 cases.In Cascade County, infections at the jail make up about a quarter of all known virus cases in the county. Health authorities say that the where to buy diflucan pills jail’s outbreak, which began in mid-August, was not believed to be the main cause of the community’s recent surge, but that it had led to some cases. In the past two months, Mr. Krogue said, the jail released 29 people who were considered actively infected.Infections at the jail make up about a quarter of Cascade County’s known virus cases.Credit...Tailyr Irvine for The New York TimesGreat Falls, home to about 58,000 residents, is in the less mountainous part of Montana, with the Missouri River flowing through and a large oil refinery on its banks. The Cascade County Detention where to buy diflucan pills Center sits along a highway at the edge of town.

Drive five miles in any direction and you are surrounded by wide-open plains.Montana requires that masks be worn inside businesses and indoor public spaces, and many people in Great Falls wear them when walking around downtown’s Central Avenue, where shops and cafes are still recovering from shutting down in the spring. Others go where to buy diflucan pills without masks, citing the open space and lack of crowds.Bob Kelly, the mayor, said people had not been overly worried about how the jail outbreak might affect the rest of town when it started.“I think that by the very definition of a jail, hopefully, the disease will be incarcerated, as well as the patients,” he said. €œIs there concern?. Sure, there’s where to buy diflucan pills concern. But is there overreaction?.

No.”The mayor of Great Falls said that residents had considered the jail’s outbreak a distant concern at first.Credit...Tailyr Irvine for The New York TimesSome residents’ nonchalance about the risks of the virus, said Mr. Krogue, the jail’s medical director, can be traced to a spring and early summer when almost no one in Cascade County knew anyone who where to buy diflucan pills had been sickened.“We benefited from that early on,” he said. €œBut in some ways, I think it did us a disservice, too, because it also created a certain level of complacency.”That has quickly shifted now, he said, as cases have spiked.The number of active cases known to county officials on any given day has risen sharply to about 600, according to Trisha Gardner, Cascade County’s health officer. The county where to buy diflucan pills has seen 1,261 cases and six deaths during the pandemic, a Times database shows. Some of the cases have been tied to the jail outbreak, she said, and others have been connected to bars and restaurants.

Even figuring out what has led to some cases has been complex, she said, as residents have been reluctant to cooperate with contact tracers.“Our hospitals are at capacity, our public health system is at capacity,” she said. €œIt’s not sustainable at this rate.”When the outbreak at the jail began, social where to buy diflucan pills distancing was impossible, the authorities said. Three inmates shared cells designed for two. At night, where to buy diflucan pills men slept on thin blue pads in every available space. On the floor in the day room, in shower stalls, in stairwells, in hallways outside of cells.Inmates did not receive masks until August, and jail officials said many have refused to wear them.In interviews with more than a dozen inmates and their family members, inmates described the jail during the outbreak as chaotic and unsanitary.

They said their pleas for help often went unanswered by nurses and guards.Newly arriving inmates were not always quarantined from one another before their test results were known because of a lack of space, inmates and jail officials said.Owen Hawley, 30, said every inmate in his living area of 38 men had tested positive for the virus. He said he had been unable to eat for three days, had intensive body aches and suffered from a headache so powerful it felt as if it was “behind my eyes.”“After the fourth day of like, not eating and stuff, I just shut off, you know? where to buy diflucan pills. € he said.A jail area set aside for quarantining new inmates.Credit...Tailyr Irvine for The New York TimesAt one point, Mr. Hawley said, he and other prisoners protested the way the virus was being handled by refusing to leave their living areas where to buy diflucan pills and by blocking new inmates from entering. Everyone was ultimately tested, Mr.

Hawley said, where to buy diflucan pills and each prisoner was given a disposable mask.Sierra Jasmine Wells, 25, another inmate, said women in her dormitory had grown ill, one after the next.“Everyone around me was getting sick and it was tough on me,” she said. €œBy then, I had already accepted the fact that I was going to get sick.”When she became infected, she said, she was given cough syrup and Tylenol.“I kind of was just left alone to deal with it,” she said.Jesse Slaughter, the county sheriff who oversees the jail, said that the jail’s medical staff was doing everything it could, and that he had been seeking health care assistance from other counties. Officials defended their handling of the outbreak, noting that all inmates received standard medications including Tylenol twice a day and were taken to area hospitals when they needed added care. Seven inmates, where to buy diflucan pills as well as some staff members, were hospitalized. No one from the jail has died from the virus, officials said.Sheriff Jesse Slaughter, who oversees the jail, said he had been seeking health care assistance from other counties.Credit...Tailyr Irvine for The New York TimesMr.

Krogue said that since the start of the where to buy diflucan pills outbreak he had been working up to 16 hours each day and sleeping in his basement, away from his wife and children. He remains healthy but says he fears bringing the virus home. The virus has slowed some in the jail, and officials have moved some inmates to other facilities, but other prisons and jails in the state are now seeing outbreaks.“You can start to see what some of these other places experienced much earlier on, and we just didn’t have that experience, but it’s certainly happening now,” Mr. Krogue said where to buy diflucan pills. €œIt’s just real in a way that it wasn’t.”Lucy Tompkins reported from Great Falls, Maura Turcotte from Chicago and Libby Seline from Lincoln, Neb.

Reporting was contributed by where to buy diflucan pills Izzy Colón from Columbia, Mo., Brendon Derr from Phoenix, Rebecca Griesbach from Tuscaloosa, Ala., Danya Issawi and Timothy Williams from New York, Ann Hinga Klein from Des Moines, K.B. Mensah from Silver Spring, Md., and Mitch Smith from Chicago.Start Preamble Federal Transit Administration (FTA), DOT. Notice of where to buy diflucan pills funding opportunity. The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) public health emergency Start Printed Page 63654has had a significant impact on transit operations. During a series of FTA listening sessions held over the last three months, transit agencies asked FTA to support research to identify solutions to address the operational challenges that they are facing as a result of COVID-19.

In response, FTA makes available through this Notice of Funding Opportunity (NOFO) funding to support research demonstration grants to public transit agencies to develop, deploy, and demonstrate innovative solutions that improve the where to buy diflucan pills operational efficiency of transit agencies, as well as enhance the mobility of transit users affected by the COVID-19 public health emergency. Demonstration grants under this NOFO are authorized under FTA's Public Transportation Innovation Program (49 U.S.C. 5312). Eligible projects will demonstrate innovative solutions to improve the operational efficiencies of transit systems and enhance mobility for their communities in four major areas. (1) Vehicle, facility, equipment and infrastructure cleaning and disinfection.

(2) exposure mitigation measures. (3) innovative mobility such as contactless payments. And (4) measures that strengthen public confidence in transit services. The total funding available for awards under this NOFO is $10,000,000. FTA may supplement this amount if additional funding becomes available.

Applicants must submit completed proposals for funding opportunity FTA-2020-015-TRI through the GRANTS.GOV “APPLY” function by 11:59 p.m. Eastern Time on November 2, 2020. Prospective applicants should register as soon as possible on the GRANTS.GOV website to ensure they can complete the application process before the submission deadline. Application instructions are available on FTA's website at http://transit.dot.gov/​howtoapply and in the “FIND” module of GRANTS.GOV. FTA will not accept mail and fax submissions.

Start Further Info Please send any questions on this notice to Jamel El-Hamri email. Jamel.El-Hamri@dot.gov phone. 2020-366-8985. A Telecommunication Device for the Deaf (TDD) is available for individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing at 1-800-877-8339. End Further Info End Preamble Start Supplemental Information Table of Contents A.

Program Description B. Federal Award Information C. Eligibility Information D. Application and Submission Information E. Application Review Information F.

Federal Award Administration Information G. Federal Awarding Agency Contact Information A. Program Description The Public Transportation COVID-19 Research Demonstration Grant Program is funded through the Public Transportation Innovation Program (49 U.S.C. 5312), with the goal to develop, deploy, and demonstrate innovative solutions that improve the operational efficiency of transit agencies, as well as enhance the mobility of transit users affected by the COVID-19 public health emergency. Eligible projects will propose to develop and deploy innovative solutions in four major areas.

(1) Vehicle, facility, equipment and infrastructure cleaning and disinfection. (2) exposure mitigation measures. (3) innovative mobility such as contactless payments. And (4) measures that strengthen public confidence in transit. As required by 49 U.S.C.

5312(e)(4), projects funded under this NOFO must participate in an evaluation by an independent outside entity that will conduct a comprehensive evaluation of the success or failure of the projects funded under this subsection and any plan for broad-based implementation of the innovation promoted by successful projects. B. Federal Award Information FTA makes available $10,000,000 in fiscal year (FY) 2020 funds under the Public Transportation Innovation Program (49 U.S.C. 5312) to finance the Public Transportation COVID-19 Research Demonstration Grant Program. FTA may supplement the total funds available if additional funding becomes available at the time project selections are made.

FTA will grant pre-award authority starting on the date of the project award announcement for selected projects and should be completed within 24 months from the date of award. Funds are available only for eligible expenses incurred after the announcement of project selections. C. Eligibility Information (1) Eligible Applicants Eligible applicants include State and local governmental authorities, direct recipients of Urbanized Area (49 U.S.C. 5307) and Rural Area (49 U.S.C.

5311) formula funds, and Indian tribes. Eligible applicants are limited to FTA grantees or subrecipients who would be the primary beneficiaries of the innovative products and services that are developed—typically public transit agencies. Except for projects proposed by Indian tribes, proposals for projects in rural (non-urbanized) areas must be submitted as part of a consolidated State proposal. States and other eligible applicants also may submit consolidated proposals for projects in urbanized areas. The submission of the Statewide application will not preclude the submission and consideration of any application from other eligible recipients in an urbanized area in a State.

Proposals may contain projects to be implemented by the recipient or its subrecipients. Eligible subrecipients include public agencies, private nonprofit organizations, and private providers engaged in public transportation. Eligible applicants may submit consolidated proposals for projects. (2) Cost Sharing or Matching The maximum Federal share of project costs is 100 percent. FTA may give additional consideration to applicants that propose a local share and may view these applicants as more competitive.

The applicant must document the source(s) of the local match, if any, in the grant application. For any applicants proposing match, eligible local match sources include the following. Cash from non-Government sources other than revenues from providing public transportation services. Revenues derived from the sale of advertising and concessions. Revenues generated from value capture financing mechanisms.

Funds from an undistributed cash surplus. Replacement or depreciation cash fund or reserve. New capital. Or in-kind contributions. (3) Eligible Projects Eligible projects will propose innovative solutions to improve operational efficiencies of transit agencies and enhance the mobility of transit users, through projects that demonstrate innovative solutions for.

Vehicle, facility, equipment and infrastructure cleaning and disinfection. Exposure mitigation measures such a real-time notification of rail and bus passenger loads. New multi-modal payment innovative mobility systems such as contactless payments. And measures that strengthen public confidence in transit. Each applicant may only submit one proposal.Start Printed Page 63655 D.

Application and Submission Information (1) Address and Form of Application Submission Applications must be submitted through GRANTS.GOV. Applicants can find general information for submitting applications through GRANTS.GOV at www.fta.dot.gov/​howtoapply, along with specific instructions for the forms and attachments required for submission. Mail and fax submissions will not be accepted. (2) Content and Form of Application Submission a. Proposal Submission A complete proposal submission consists of at least two forms.

1. The SF-424 Mandatory Form (downloadable from GRANTS.GOV) and 2. The supplemental form for the FY 2020 COVID-19 Demonstration Program (downloadable from GRANTS.GOV), which is available on FTA's website at (placeholder for FTA COVID-19 Demonstration Program). The application must include responses to all sections of the SF-424 mandatory form and the supplemental form unless a section is indicated as optional. FTA will use the information on the supplemental form to determine applicant and project eligibility for the program and to evaluate the proposal against the selection criteria described in part E of this notice.

FTA will accept only one supplemental form per SF-424 submission. FTA encourages applicants to consider submitting a single supplemental form that includes multiple activities to be evaluated as a consolidated proposal. Applicants may attach additional supporting information to the SF-424 submission, including but not limited to letters of support, project budgets, or excerpts from relevant planning documents. Supporting documentation must be described and referenced by file name in the appropriate response section of the supplemental form, or it may not be reviewed. Information such as applicant name, Federal amount requested, local match amount, description of areas served, etc., may be requested in varying degrees of detail on both the SF-424 form and supplemental form.

Applicants must fill in all fields unless stated otherwise on the forms. If applicants copy information into the supplemental form from another source, they should verify that the supplemental form has fully captured pasted text and that it has not truncated the text due to character limits built into the form. Applicants should use both the “Check Package for Errors” and the “Validate Form” validation buttons on both forms to check all required fields. Applicants should also ensure that the Federal and local amounts specified are consistent. Addressing the deteriorating conditions and disproportionately high fatality rates on our rural transportation infrastructure is of critical interest to the Department, as rural transportation networks face unique challenges in safety, infrastructure condition, and passenger and freight usage.

Consistent with the R.O.U.T.E.S. Initiative, the Department encourages applicants to consider how the project will address the challenges faced by rural areas. B. Application Content The SF-424 Mandatory Form and the supplemental form will prompt applicants for the required information, including. I.

Applicant Name ii. Dun and Bradstreet (D&B) Data Universal Numbering System (DUNS) number iii. Key contact information (contact name, address, email address, and phone number) iv. Congressional district(s) where project will take place v. Project Information (title, executive summary, and type) vi.

A detailed description of the need for the project vii. A detailed description of how the project will support the Program objectives viii. Evidence that the applicant can provide the local cost shares ix. A description of the technical, legal, and financial capacity of the applicant x. A detailed project budget xi.

Details on the local matching funds xii. A detailed project timeline xiii. Whether the project impacts an Opportunity Zone (3) Unique Entity Identifier and System for Award Management (SAM) Each applicant is required to. (1) Be registered in SAM before submitting an application. (2) provide a valid unique entity identifier in its application.

And (3) continue to maintain an active SAM registration with current information at all times during which the applicant has an active Federal award or an application or plan under consideration by FTA. These requirements do not apply if the applicant. (1) Is excepted from the requirements under 2 CFR 25.110(b) or (c). Or (2) has an exception approved by FTA under 2 CFR 25.110(d). FTA may not make an award until the applicant has complied with all applicable unique entity identifier and SAM requirements.

If an applicant has not fully complied with the requirements by the time FTA is ready to make an award, FTA may determine that the applicant is not qualified to receive an award and use that determination as a basis for making a Federal award to another applicant. All applicants must provide a unique entity identifier provided by SAM. Registration in SAM may take as little as 3-5 business days, but there can be unexpected steps or delays. For example, the applicant may need to obtain an Employer Identification Number. FTA recommends allowing ample time, up to several weeks, to complete all steps.

For additional information on obtaining a unique entity identifier, please visit www.sam.gov. (4) Submission Dates and Times Project proposals must be submitted electronically through GRANTS.GOV by 11:59 p.m. Eastern on November 2, 2020. Mail and fax submissions will not be accepted. FTA urges applicants to submit applications at least 72 hours prior to the due date to allow time to correct any problems that may have caused either GRANTS.GOV or FTA systems to reject the submission.

Proposals submitted after the deadline will only be considered under extraordinary circumstances not within the applicant's control. Deadlines will not be extended due to scheduled website maintenance. GRANTS.GOV scheduled maintenance and outage times are announced on the GRANTS.GOV website. Within 48 hours after submitting an electronic application, the applicant should receive two email messages from GRANTS.GOV. (1) Confirmation of successful transmission to GRANTS.GOV.

And (2) confirmation of successful validation by GRANTS.GOV. If the applicant does not receive confirmation of successful validation or receives a notice of failed validation or incomplete materials, the applicant must address the reason for the failed validation, as described in the email notice, and resubmit before the submission deadline. If making a resubmission for any reason, applicants must include all original attachments regardless of which attachments were updated and check the box on the supplemental form indicating this is a resubmission. Applicants are encouraged to begin the process of registration on the GRANTS.GOV site well in advance of the submission deadline. Registration is Start Printed Page 63656a multi-step process, which may take several weeks to complete before an application can be submitted.

Registered applicants may still be required to update their registration before submitting an application. Registration in SAM is renewed annually and persons making submissions on behalf of the Authorized Organization Representative (AOR) must be authorized in GRANTS.GOV by the AOR to make submissions. (5) Funding Restrictions Funds may be used for post-award expenditures only. Funds under this NOFO cannot be used to reimburse projects for otherwise eligible expenses incurred prior to the date of project award announcements. (6) Other Submission Requirements FTA encourages applicants to identify scaled funding options in case insufficient funding is available to fund a project at the full requested amount.

If an applicant indicates that a project is scalable, the applicant must provide an appropriate minimum funding amount that will fund an eligible project that achieves the objectives of the program and meets all relevant program requirements. The applicant must provide a clear explanation of how a reduced award would affect the project budget and scope. FTA may award a lesser amount whether or not the applicant provides a scalable option. E. Application Review Information (1) Project Evaluation Criteria Addressing the deteriorating conditions and disproportionately high fatality rates on our rural transportation infrastructure is of critical interest to the Department, as rural transportation networks face unique challenges in safety, infrastructure condition, and passenger and freight usage.

Consistent with the R.O.U.T.E.S. Initiative, the Department will consider how the project will address the challenges faced by rural areas. In addition, the Department will review and consider applications for funding pursuant to this Notice in accordance with the President's September 2, 2020 memorandum, entitled Memorandum on Reviewing Funding to State and Local Government Recipients of Federal Funds that Are Permitting Anarchy, Violence, and Destruction in American Cities, consistent with guidance from the Office of Management and Budget and the Attorney General and with all applicable laws. FTA will evaluate proposals submitted according to the following criteria. (a) Project Innovation and Impact.

(b) Project Approach. (c) National Applicability. (d) Commercialization and/or Knowledge Transfer. And (e) Technical, Legal and Financial Capacity. FTA encourages each applicant to demonstrate how a project supports all criteria with the most relevant information the applicant can provide, regardless of whether such information has been specifically requested or identified in this notice.

A. Project Innovation and Impact i. Effectiveness of the project in achieving and demonstrating the specific objectives of this program. Ii. Demonstration of benefits in addressing the needs of the transit agency and industry and impacts to infrastructure, equipment, transit workforce, and riders.

Iii. Degree of improvement over current and existing technologies, designs, and/or practices applicable to the transit industry. B. Project Approach i. Quality of the project approach such as existing partnerships, collaboration strategies and level of commitment of the project partners.

Ii. Proposal is realistic in its approach to fulfill the milestones/deliverables, schedule and goals. C. National Applicability i. Degree to which the project could be replicated by other transit agencies regionally or nationally.

Ii. Ability to evaluate technologies, designs and/or practices in a wide variety of conditions and locales. Iii. Degree to which the technology, designs and/or practices can be replicated by other transportation modes. D.

Commercialization and/or Knowledge Transfer i. Demonstrates a realistic plan for moving the results of the project into the transit marketplace (patents, conferences, articles in trade magazines, webinar, site visits, etc.). Ii. How the project team plans to work with the industry on improving best practices, guidance and/or standards, if applicable. Iii.

Demonstrate a clear understanding and robust approach to data collection, access and management. E. Technical, Legal and Financial Capacity Capacity of the applicant and any partners to successfully execute the project effort. There should be no outstanding legal, technical, or financial issues with the applicant that would make this a high-risk project. (2) Review and Selection Process An FTA technical evaluation committee will evaluate proposals based on the published project evaluation criteria.

Members of the technical evaluation committee will rate the applications and may seek clarification about any statement in an application. The FTA Administrator will determine the final selection and amount of funding for each project after consideration of the findings of the technical evaluation committee. Geographic diversity, diversity of the project type, the amount of local match to be provided, and the applicant's receipt and management of other Federal transit funds may be considered in FTA's award decisions. Prior fare payment innovation efforts may receive priority consideration. The FTA Administrator will consider the following key DOT objectives.

A. Utilizing alternative funding sources and innovative financing models to attract non-Federal sources of investment. B. Whether the project is located in or supports public transportation service in a qualified opportunity zone designated pursuant to 26.U.S.C. 1400Z-1.

And c. The extent to which the project addresses challenges specific to the provision of rural public transportation. (3) FAPIIS Review Prior to making a grant award, FTA is required to review and consider any information about the applicant that is in the Federal Awardee Performance and Integrity Information System (FAPIIS) accessible through SAM. An applicant may review and comment on information about itself that a Federal awarding agency previously entered. FTA will consider any comments by the applicant, in addition to the other information in FAPIIS, in making a judgment about the applicant's integrity, business ethics, and record of performance under Federal awards when completing the review of risk posed by applicants as described in 2 CFR 200.205 Federal Awarding Agency Review of Risk Posed by Applicants.

F. Federal Award Administration Information (1) Federal Award Notices FTA will announce the final project selections on the FTA website. Project recipients should contact their FTA Regional Office for additional information regarding allocations for Start Printed Page 63657projects. At the time project selections are announced, FTA will extend pre-award authority for the selected projects. There is no blanket pre-award authority for these projects before announcement.

There is no minimum or maximum grant award amount, but FTA intends to fund as many meritorious projects as possible. FTA only will consider proposals from eligible recipients for eligible activities. Due to funding limitations, projects selected for funding may receive less than the amount originally requested. In those cases, applicants must be able to demonstrate that the proposed projects are still viable and can be completed with the amount awarded. (2) Administrative and National Policy Requirements a.

Pre-Award Authority FTA will issue specific guidance to recipients regarding pre-award authority at the time of selection. FTA does not provide pre-award authority for competitive funds until projects are selected, and there are Federal requirements that must be met before costs are incurred. For more information about FTA's policy on pre-award authority, see the FY 2020 Apportionments Notice published on June 3, 2020, at https://www.govinfo.gov/​content/​pkg/​FR-2020-06-03/​pdf/​2020-11946.pdf. b. Grant Requirements Selected applicants will submit a grant application through FTA's electronic grant management system and adhere to the customary FTA grant requirements for research project (insert Circular name).

All competitive grants, regardless of award amount, will be subject to the Congressional notification and release process. FTA emphasizes that third-party procurement applies to all funding awards, as described in FTA Circular 4220.1F, “Third Party Contracting Guidance.” However, FTA may approve applications that include a specifically identified partnering organization(s) (2 CFR 200.302(f)). When included, the application, budget, and budget narrative should provide a clear understanding of how the selection of these organizations is critical for the project and give sufficient detail about the costs involved. C. Planning FTA encourages applicants to engage the appropriate State Departments of Transportation, Regional Transportation Planning Organizations, or Metropolitan Planning Organizations in areas to be served by the project funds available under this program.

D. Standard Assurances The applicant assures that it will comply with all applicable Federal statutes, regulations, executive orders, FTA circulars, and other Federal administrative requirements in carrying out any project supported by the FTA grant. The applicant acknowledges that it is under a continuing obligation to comply with the terms and conditions of the grant agreement issued for its project with FTA. The applicant understands that Federal laws, regulations, policies, and administrative practices might be modified from time to time and may affect the implementation of the project. The applicant agrees that the most recent Federal requirements will apply to the project unless FTA issues a written determination otherwise.

The applicant must submit the Certifications and Assurances before receiving a grant if it does not have current certifications on file. E. Free Speech and Religious Liberty In connection with any program or activity conducted with or benefiting from funds awarded under this notice, recipients of funds must comply with all applicable requirements of Federal law, including, without limitation, the Constitution of the United States. Statutory, regulatory, and public policy requirements, including without limitation, those protecting free speech, religious liberty, public welfare, the environment, and prohibiting discrimination. The conditions of performance, non-discrimination requirements, and other assurances made applicable to the award of funds in accordance with regulations of the Department of Transportation.

And applicable Federal financial assistance and contracting principles promulgated by the Office of Management and Budget. In complying with these requirements, recipients must ensure that no concession agreements are denied or other contracting decisions made on the basis of speech or other activities protected by the First Amendment. If the Department determines that a recipient has failed to comply with applicable Federal requirements, the Department may terminate the award of funds and disallow previously incurred costs, requiring the recipient to reimburse any expended award funds. (3) Reporting The post-award reporting requirements include submission of the Federal Financial Report (FFR) and Milestone Progress Report in TrAMS. An evaluation of the grant will occur at various points in the demonstration process and at the end of the project.

In addition, FTA is responsible for producing an Annual Report to Congress that compiles evaluation of selected projects, including an evaluation of the performance measures identified by the applicants. All applicants must develop an evaluation plan to measure the success or failure of their projects and describe any plans for broad-based implementation of successful projects. FTA may request data and reports to support the evaluation and Annual Report. A. Independent Evaluation To achieve a comprehensive understanding of the impacts and implications of each proposed COVID-19 Research Demonstration Program, projects funded under this announcement will require the recipient to conduct a third party independent evaluation of their project.

Recipients will be required to contract with a third party independent evaluator to assist in developing an evaluation plan, and collecting, storing and managing data required to fulfill the evaluation requirement. No more than 10 percent of the Federal share of the project may be used to hire the third-party independent evaluator and the inclusion of a third-party independent evaluation should be described in the grant application. If the project duration is more than two years, an interim evaluation report would need to be submitted to FTA, otherwise the evaluation report should be included as part of the final project report. B. COVID-19 Research Demonstration Grant Program Evaluation Projects funded under this announcement will be required to establish a set of performance metrics set by the third-party independent evaluator and shared with FTA.

G. Federal Awarding Agency Contacts Information For questions about applying, please contact Jamel El-Hamri email. Jamel.El-Hamri@dot.gov phone. 202-366-8985. A TDD is available at 1-800-877-8339 (TDDFIRS).

To ensure that applicants receive accurate information about eligibility or the program, applicants are encouraged to contact FTA directly with questions, rather than through intermediaries or third parties.Start Printed Page 63658 FTA staff also may conduct briefings on the competitive grants selection and award process upon request. Start Signature K. Jane Williams, Deputy Administrator. End Signature End Supplemental Information [FR Doc. 2020-22316 Filed 10-7-20.

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Letzte Änderung: 20.11.2018 
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